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28 Days Later [UMD for PSP]
28 Days Later
UMD for PSP
Actors: Cillian Murphy, Naomie Harris, Christopher Eccleston, Alex Palmer, Bindu De Stoppani
Director: Danny Boyle
Genres: Horror, Science Fiction & Fantasy, Mystery & Suspense
R     2005     1hr 53min

Hailed as the most frightening film since The Exorcist, acclaimed Director Danny Boyle's visionary take on zombie horror "isn't just scary?it's absolutely terrifying" (Access Hollywood). An infirmary patient awakens from ...  more »

     

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Movie Details

Actors: Cillian Murphy, Naomie Harris, Christopher Eccleston, Alex Palmer, Bindu De Stoppani
Director: Danny Boyle
Creators: Anthony Dod Mantle, Chris Gill, Andrew Macdonald, Robert How, Alex Garland
Genres: Horror, Science Fiction & Fantasy, Mystery & Suspense
Sub-Genres: Horror, Science Fiction & Fantasy, Mystery & Suspense
Studio: 20th Century Fox
Format: UMD for PSP - Color,Widescreen - Closed-captioned,Dubbed,Subtitled
DVD Release Date: 11/01/2005
Original Release Date: 06/27/2003
Theatrical Release Date: 06/27/2003
Release Year: 2005
Run Time: 1hr 53min
Screens: Color,Widescreen
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaDVD Credits: 1
Total Copies: 0
Members Wishing: 0
MPAA Rating: R (Restricted)
Languages: English, Finnish, French, Italian, Spanish, English, French, Spanish
Subtitles: English, Spanish
See Also:

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Movie Reviews

Horror film? Nah... Great film? Yes, definitely!
J. C. Vera | Miami, Fl United States | 06/30/2003
(5 out of 5 stars)

"There is very little about this movie that can be considered "horror" per se. At best, in this sense, the film is a suspense flick, with a somewhat spooky score/soundtrack (that added plenty to the tension in its atmosphere), and a great cast who portrayed the best and worst traits in human nature. I can understand those who give the movie a bad review since they were expecting something extremely scary (that's the way in which it is being marketed) and ended up watching an intelligent, well presented study in good and evil, right vs. wrong, loyalty vs. survival, and many other concepts that one wouldn't expect from a "horror" flick. This movie, in that sense, simply was not what the average goer was promised. Now, as far as good films are concerned, this is definitely a worthy effort. It has more depth than one could ever expect; the cinematography is done extremely well; and the acting is superb (even on the part of the nearly silent and secondary infected characters). The symbolism is one that the average movie watcher might not get, especially if they're looking for two hours of gore or scary moments (there are very few of those, as the director clearly preferred to refrain from using extremely graphic imagery). Indeed, what makes this film a valuable one is the social criticism and the analysis of human nature that it presents. What is more important, survival or friendship/family? Are the ethics of scientific research being checked to prevent the creation of harmful agents (even if not as tragic and extreme as what we see in this film)? Is it worth fighting for one's life when hope is dim or even non-existant? Many more questions arise and give extreme value to this film. This is definitely an excellent example of existentialist movie making. Whether it is a horror film or not becomes irrelevant once you observe its true meaning.So, if you are the kind of person who enjoys trashy and bloody films like the Jason or Freddy "epics," or if you cannot handle too much thinking while at the theatre, then this is not a movie for you. If you've enjoyed "smart" flicks like "Lost Highway," "Frailty," or "The Ring," then this is definitely for you. You will feel good about seeing this one, even though it portrays so many bad and ugly things about us as "humans.""
Stylish Homage to '70s Flicks
Bruce Crocker | Whittier, California United States | 06/28/2003
(5 out of 5 stars)

"28 Days Later is stylish, lonely, bloody, desperate, wet, violent, frantic, thoughtful, scary and, ultimately, hopeful. Danny Boyle artfully directs Alex Garland's script while paying homage to movies like the Omega Man and George Romero's Dead trilogy. As hard as it is for me to say, 28 Days is a much better film than any of the films mentioned above.The movie focuses on the people who have not been infected with a virus that turns humans into rage filled zombies. In fact, the zombies only make a few screen appearances, the fear factor of the movie coming mainly from the reactions of the uninfected people to their situation. The main characters are well acted and I cared about what happened to them. Visually the movie is a masterpiece and the scenes in an empty London are incredible.I recommend 28 Days Later to fans of the other movies mentioned above or anybody looking for a thoughtful, scary zombie film. People looking to pull their brain out for a few hours or for non-stop gore and zombies will most likely be disappointed."
Blu-ray review on the video resolution (know this before you
roebeet | Morrisville, PA | 12/31/2009
(4 out of 5 stars)

"First off, my four stars are for the movie itself - an excellent re-imaging of the "Zombie" genre.

Now, onto the video resolution issue that many reviewers are complaining about. I was also shocked when I rented this Blu-ray and saw the awful video resolution. Basically, it's no better than a standard DVD except for the closing scene.

The reason: The film was filmed mostly in standard DV resolution, using a Canon XL1s camcorder (the closing scene being the exception - it was filmed in 35mm). DV is very low resolution in comparison to HD or 35mm film, so the problem (if you consider this a problem) is with the source material, NOT the transfer to Blu-ray. It was the director's decision to film in standard DV, so this is the best resolution that you will ever see of this film.

So, if you don't have this movie and the Blu-ray and the DVD version are the same price, I'd probably stick with the Blu-ray version just for future compatibility. But, if you already have the DVD version, I would recommend just sticking with that copy for now because the Blu-ray version isn't going to offer any enhancements, other than the closing scene.

"
Not just another horror flick
Esther Park | 10/20/2004
(5 out of 5 stars)

"I have begun to think that zombie movies are fundamentally about social alienation: the paranoid fantasy that anyone, even the people you love, can suddenly become an inhuman monster and turn against you. This is definitely true of this movie, for me: I feel most scared by it when I am feeling most alienated and downtrodden by society.

In any case, this was the scariest movie I have ever seen. Not just make you jump scary but get under your skin and give you nightmares scary. After seeing it, I had to sleep with my lights on and doors open for two months. But also it really made me think about things like: what is civilization? At one point they have a captive infected and the army guy is studying him. The hero asks him what he has learned and he answers, "I have learned that he will never bake bread." Okay, laugh at me if you want, but I like to bake bread, the old-fashioned way, starting with yeast and doing it all by hand. But I never really thought about all the factors that baking bread depends on: the domestication of wheat, a process that took thousands of years; sufficient social organization to harvest, process and distribute it; my knowledge of the exact formula necessary to get the bread to work right; the gas company delivering gas to my apartment so I can bake it... and so on. What a long and fragile chain of things that could be broken at any link. That's civilization, something we all take for granted.

Another thing I really liked about this movie (although I will never see it again because it scared the heck out of me and anyway I can practically replay the whole thing in my memory) is the way certain otherwise ordinary moments are made transcendant--a bridge or an airplane brings almost you to a state of grace.

Finally, the army guys show that the potential for infection is not just from blood; it's in our blood. It doesn't take a lab experiment gone out of control. It could happen any time and does. That's what war is."