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3 Extremes
3 Extremes
Actors: Ling Bai, Byung-hun Lee, Kyoko Hasegawa, Pauline Lau, Tony Leung Ka Fai
Directors: Chan-wook Park, Fruit Chan, Takashi Miike
Genres: Indie & Art House, Horror
R     2006     2hr 5min

A compilation of three different short films entitled cut box & dumplings by directors from japan korea & china that all deal with the theme of human monstrosity & exploring the outer limits of the macabre. Studio: Lions ...  more »


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Movie Details

Actors: Ling Bai, Byung-hun Lee, Kyoko Hasegawa, Pauline Lau, Tony Leung Ka Fai
Directors: Chan-wook Park, Fruit Chan, Takashi Miike
Creators: Chan-wook Park, Ahn Soo-Hyun, Bun Saikou, Haruko Fukushima, Lilian Lee
Genres: Indie & Art House, Horror
Sub-Genres: Indie & Art House, Horror
Studio: Lions Gate
Format: DVD - Color - Closed-captioned,Subtitled
DVD Release Date: 02/28/2006
Original Release Date: 01/01/2004
Theatrical Release Date: 01/01/2004
Release Year: 2006
Run Time: 2hr 5min
Screens: Color
Number of Discs: 2
SwapaDVD Credits: 2
Total Copies: 0
Members Wishing: 0
Edition: Special Edition
MPAA Rating: R (Restricted)
Languages: Japanese, Korean
Subtitles: English, Spanish

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Member Movie Reviews

Brad S. (Snibot) from DALLAS, TX
Reviewed on 1/22/2010...
Excellent pieces, if you are into Horror/Thrillers this movie will have something for you. Most of the people that watched this movie with me liked 2 of the 3 pieces, though we didn't agree on which two.

Dumplings, was the movie I didn't particularly care for, I could see a lot of it coming, though the acting was good and the plot was interesting.

Cut, was very well done as far as acting, story, and plot. It uses some twisted humor as well, which really won it a lot of points with me.

Box, was by far my favorite, it was intricate and used a cleaver time line to tell the story, acting was marvelous, and cinematography was really good. I loved the snow scenes, they were absolutely beautiful.

Movie Reviews

Three Horror Stories From The Asian Masters--A Good Compilat
K. Harris | Las Vegas, NV | 03/11/2007
(4 out of 5 stars)

"I was stoked when I first heard of the concept for this film (although, for some reason, it's taken me years to actually see it). Uniting three of the finest Asian horror directors, "3 Extremes" is an anthology showcasing short films--each about 40 minutes in length. Well, there's good news and bad news. Overall, I quite enjoyed "3 Extremes" and would recommend it to any fans of the genre. But as with most things in the anthology format, different segments will appeal to different people. And, interestingly enough, the filmmaker I was eagerly anticipating presented the most mundane story and the one I was least familiar with provided the film's best moments.

The first segment is "Dumplings," courtesy of Hong Kong's Fruit Chan. Chan, whose work I am the least familiar with, provides the most wickedly entertaining story. Bai Ling (and who doesn't love Bai Ling?) plays an industrious entrepreneur who makes and markets special dumplings that help women regain their youth. Operating out of her apartment, the dumplings are prepared lovingly with.....let's just call it a special ingredient. I found the entire episode to be smart and grotesque--always a winning combination. I'd award this segment 5 stars.

Next up, the macabre and over-the-top entry from Korea's Park Chan-Wook is entitled "Cut." Chan-Wook has increased in popularity lately due to "Old Boy" and the "Vengeance" pictures, and "Cut" doesn't stray too far from that successful formula. A film director finds himself held captive by a disgruntled extra, and to survive he must prove that he is capable of evil. Elaborately staged (think something excessive from the "Saw" franchise), this segment is fascinating and theatrical. It lacks a little bite due to its artifice, but still manages to be great fun. A solid 4 star experience.

Last, we have "Box" from one of my favorites--Japan's Takashi Miike. As I alluded to earlier, this methodically paced segment was the least effective for me. Taking a cue from a traditional Japanese ghost story, a young woman is haunted by a family tragedy in her past. It's pretty standard fare mixing reality with dreams, but a nice ending helps the piece overall. Still, about 3 stars.

Check this out if you're a fan of this type of entertainment. I do wish that they had restructured the segments. If they had been placed in reverse order, the film's momentum would have built. Instead, by leading with the most intriguing segment, it did go somewhat downhill from there. KGHarris, 03/07."
kitkatt | ma | 12/18/2006
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Three separate stories with horrific plots. These are not for the faint of heart. Horror with actual stories to them. Not just screaming stupid teenagers. I will be seeing more movies from these directors. Be warned these are not "nice scary" or "funny scary". Enjoy!"
Tasty sample platter of Asian Horror.
Reynaldo De Guzman | American Canyon, CA USA | 01/21/2006
(4 out of 5 stars)

"I have had this film for several months now, as I purchased it as an all-region import disc. The film is actually an omnibus of three films, one film each directed by Takashi Miike of Japan, Fruit Chan of Hong Kong, and Park Chan-wook of South Korea. Of the two, Miike and Park are no doubt well known here in the U.S. This is my first exposure to the work of Chan and based on his contribution, I look forward to seeing other of his films. The first film is "Box," directed by Miike. This is some of the most strongest, recent work done by Miike. I thought that "Zebraman" was okay, and I was impressed with "Izo" though it did tend to be repetitive. "Box" however, is visually impressive and calls to mind the work of David Lynch. The brief running time also seems to have made for a more coherent and focused story. I don't want to give too much away, but like Miike's best work, "Box" is disturbing and unforgettable. Chan's "Dumplings" follows next. Now, this film is not only disturbing, it's haunting and a bit gross. "Dumplings" isn't gory though. Let me just say that when you find out what the filling in the dumplings is, you may begin to feel a bit queasy. There is a full-length version of this film as well, and I really would like an oppotunity to see that version. Bai Ling is actually pretty funny in this film. She should definitely do more overseas work. "Dumplings" has probably one of the most haunting last shots you will see. Very good film, arguably the best of the three. The last film is "Cut." This is my least favorite of the three. I've seen Park's other films and this one comes across as very light weight. With it's excessive gore the film plays like a "Grand Guignol." Park even appears to satirize his revenge trilogy. Pay attention to the words spoken by the son of the villain of the piece. I recommend this movie wholeheartedly. I don't think you will be disappointed."