Search - 32 Short Films About Glenn Gould on DVD


32 Short Films About Glenn Gould
32 Short Films About Glenn Gould
Actors: Colm Feore, Derek Keurvorst, Katya Ladan, Devon Anderson, Joshua Greenblatt
Director: François Girard
Genres: Drama, Musicals & Performing Arts
NR     2001     1hr 38min

François Girard originally conceived 32 Short Films About Glenn Gould as a biography to try to explain the bizarre genius of the master pianist who stopped touring in 1963 at the height of his success. The 32 parts play ou...  more »

     
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Movie Details

Actors: Colm Feore, Derek Keurvorst, Katya Ladan, Devon Anderson, Joshua Greenblatt
Director: François Girard
Creators: Amy J. Kaufman, Barbara Willis Sweete, Daniel Iron, Glenn Gould, Nick McKinney
Genres: Drama, Musicals & Performing Arts
Sub-Genres: Drama, Classical
Studio: Sony Pictures
Format: DVD - Color,Widescreen - Closed-captioned
DVD Release Date: 02/20/2001
Original Release Date: 11/26/1993
Theatrical Release Date: 11/26/1993
Release Year: 2001
Run Time: 1hr 38min
Screens: Color,Widescreen
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaDVD Credits: 1
Total Copies: 0
Members Wishing: 9
MPAA Rating: NR (Not Rated)
Languages: English, French

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Member Movie Reviews

Kendra M. (KendraM) from NASHVILLE, TN
Reviewed on 5/19/2008...
To dismiss Glenn Gould as a neurotic or eccentric is quite missing the point. While he was these things, he was also much more. Gould was likely one of the finest interpreters of J.S. Bach on the piano in the last 50 years. His musical output is mammoth and his technical skill almost unsurpassed. Gould is a fascinating character. Having difficulty with personal relationships, Gould left his sizable fortune to his cats. Leaving this earth too early, Gould's legacy is still felt in the musical world and will be for many generations to come.

This movie is a fascinating entre into Gould's world and into his mind. For anyone who enjoys Gould's music this movie is derigeur.

While Gould is played by an actor in the movie, Gould certainly is playing the piano. Sergei Eisenstein the great film director once said, "One should be able to see the music and hear the image." This film about Gould lets that happen.

Done in short mini-films, 32 Short Films combines to create an image of Gould much like a Bach two- or three-part invention disc does for Bach's masterpiece. Separately, each stands alone and has value and import but together a new, vivid and complete unit is formed.

Gould is so brilliant and talented-- yet self-absorbed, that he practically lives inside his head. The movie shows him having difficulty, as many brilliant artists do, in interacting in a satisfying way (to themselves and for the other) with other people. But there were moments when all the walls fell away, and all the neuroses pushed aside so that a real, yet brief connection could be made with another. There is such a moment in this film and for me it was the highlight.

In the most beautiful sequence of the movie, Gould is in a hotel in Europe, Germany if I recall correctly-- the land of Bach himself. He is preparing for an evening's concert and has just received by courier the brand new pressing of his newest Bach LP. It is a lovely day, Gould is silent and preparing. A maid enters his room, she doesn't appear to know that the man in the room is Glenn Gould, likely the greatest pianist alive on the planet at that time. He asks her if she would like to hear something. He places his brand new LP, Bach piano, on his record player and puts the needle down. The disc is spinning... stunning piano music is heard.

The maid is shown almost in a dream a kind of reverie as she glances out the hotel room overlooking the German city, transported by Bach music played so superbly on the piano. Gould lets the woman enjoy the moments as he watches her reaction in silence. She glances from the window and the realization that it is Gould himself who is playing the piano on the recording arises in her eyes. It is a beautiful moment. The maid is humbled and completely appreciative of this gift that Gould has just given her. She says, "Thank you." I have never seen a "thank you" delivered by any actor on film seem so meaningful and important as that one. This is what Bach does to people who care to listen... Bach transports you.

When played by a pianist such as Gould, it's only a matter of time before Bach grabs your imagination and soul and takes you on a grand journey. Gould seems almost a channeler more than a virtuouso pianist. One can almost see the master standing over Gould as he plays whispering to him. Perhaps this is why Gould is often heard on his recordings humming-- perhaps Bach is just too close.

The world is a lesser place with Gould not existing in it, playing for us, bringing Bach alive through his awesome talents. But, for a few minutes, with this movie-- we have him back in all his glory and fascinating eccentricities. Bravo!

Movie Reviews

Brilliant Eccentric Glenn Gould - Bach Piano Master
Kendra | 04/03/2008
(5 out of 5 stars)

"To dismiss Glenn Gould as a neurotic or eccentric is quite missing the point. While he was these things, he was also much more. Gould was likely one of the finest interpreters of J.S. Bach on the piano in the last 50 years. His musical output is mammoth and his technical skill almost unsurpassed. Gould is a fascinating character. Having difficulty with personal relationships, Gould left his sizable fortune to his cats. Leaving this earth too early, Gould's legacy is still felt in the musical world and will be for many generations to come.

This movie is a fascinating entre into Gould's world and into his mind. For anyone who enjoys Gould's music this movie is derigeur.

While Gould is played by an actor in the movie, Gould certainly is playing the piano. Sergei Eisenstein the great film director once said, "One should be able to see the music and hear the image." This film about Gould lets that happen.

Done in short mini-films, 32 Short Films combines to create an image of Gould much like a Bach two- or three-part invention disc does for Bach's masterpiece. Separately, each stands alone and has value and import but together a new, vivid and complete unit is formed.

Gould is so brilliant and talented-- yet self-absorbed, that he practically lives inside his head. The movie shows him having difficulty, as many brilliant artists do, in interacting in a satisfying way (to themselves and for the other) with other people. But there were moments when all the walls fell away, and all the neuroses pushed aside so that a real, yet brief connection could be made with another. There is such a moment in this film and for me it was the highlight.

In the most beautiful sequence of the movie, Gould is in a hotel in Europe, Germany if I recall correctly-- the land of Bach himself. He is preparing for an evening's concert and has just received by courier the brand new pressing of his newest Bach LP. It is a lovely day, Gould is silent and preparing. A maid enters his room, she doesn't appear to know that the man in the room is Glenn Gould, likely the greatest pianist alive on the planet at that time. He asks her if she would like to hear something. He places his brand new LP, Bach piano, on his record player and puts the needle down. The disc is spinning... stunning piano music is heard.

The maid is shown almost in a dream a kind of reverie as she glances out the hotel room overlooking the German city, transported by Bach music played so superbly on the piano. Gould lets the woman enjoy the moments as he watches her reaction in silence. She glances from the window and the realization that it is Gould himself who is playing the piano on the recording arises in her eyes. It is a beautiful moment. The maid is humbled and completely appreciative of this gift that Gould has just given her. She says, "Thank you." I have never seen a "thank you" delivered by any actor on film seem so meaningful and important as that one. This is what Bach does to people who care to listen... Bach transports you.

When played by a pianist such as Gould, it's only a matter of time before Bach grabs your imagination and soul and takes you on a grand journey. Gould seems almost a channeler more than a virtuouso pianist. One can almost see the master standing over Gould as he plays whispering to him. Perhaps this is why Gould is often heard on his recordings humming-- perhaps Bach is just too close.

The world is a lesser place with Gould not existing in it, playing for us, bringing Bach alive through his awesome talents. But, for a few minutes, with this movie-- we have him back in all his glory and fascinating eccentricities. Bravo!"
If you take a second to look beyond...
Brian Shaw | 11/30/2009
(5 out of 5 stars)

"This movie is great! One of my all-time favorites. The thing is though, it's abstract. Very abstract. You have to think way outside the box and really ponder on what the movie could mean... I promise you though, it does mean something! Aside from that, it's also a great tribute to the life of Glenn Gould. I'd highly recommend this movie to anyone who likes to think about what they watch, rather than just accept "Transformers" or whatever as the end-all-be-all of cinema."