Search - Abbott & Costello Meet Frankenstein on DVD

Abbott & Costello Meet Frankenstein
Abbott Costello Meet Frankenstein
Actors: Bud Abbott, Lou Costello, Lon Chaney Jr., Bela Lugosi, Glenn Strange
Director: Charles Barton
Genres: Comedy, Science Fiction & Fantasy
NR     2000     1hr 23min

Abbott and Costello are working as railroad clerks and receive a shipment containing the last remains of Dracula and Frankenstein. When the remains disappear the clerks are blamed. — Genre: Feature Film-Comedy — Rating: NR — ...  more »


Larger Image

Movie Details

Actors: Bud Abbott, Lou Costello, Lon Chaney Jr., Bela Lugosi, Glenn Strange
Director: Charles Barton
Creators: Charles Van Enger, Robert Arthur, Bram Stoker, Frederic I. Rinaldo, John Grant, Mary Shelley, Robert Lees
Genres: Comedy, Science Fiction & Fantasy
Sub-Genres: Classic Comedies, Science Fiction & Fantasy
Studio: Universal Studios
Format: DVD - Black and White,Full Screen - Closed-captioned,Subtitled
DVD Release Date: 08/29/2000
Original Release Date: 06/15/1948
Theatrical Release Date: 06/15/1948
Release Year: 2000
Run Time: 1hr 23min
Screens: Black and White,Full Screen
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaDVD Credits: 1
Total Copies: 0
Members Wishing: 10
MPAA Rating: NR (Not Rated)
Languages: English
Subtitles: French
See Also:

Similar Movies

Abbott and Costello Meet the Mummy
Director: Charles Lamont
   UR   2001   1hr 19min
Frankenstein Meets the Wolf Man / House of Frankenstein
Universal Studios Frankenstein Double Feature
Directors: Erle C. Kenton, Roy William Neill
   UR   2007   2hr 25min
The Wolf Man - The Legacy Collection
The Wolf Man / Werewolf of London / Frankenstein Meets the Wolf Man / She-Wolf of London
Directors: David J. Skal, George Waggner, Jean Yarbrough, Roy William Neill, Stuart Walker
   NR   2004   1hr 10min
Frankenstein - The Legacy Collection
Frankenstein / The Bride of / Son of / The Ghost of / House of
Directors: David J. Skal, Erle C. Kenton, James Whale, Rowland V. Lee
   UR   2004   6hr 24min
Ed Wood
   R   2012

Similarly Requested DVDs

Pirates of the Caribbean - The Curse of the Black Pearl
Two-Disc Collector's Edition
Director: Gore Verbinski
   PG-13   2003   2hr 23min
Single-Disc Edition
   PG-13   2009   2hr 2min
The Invasion
Director: Oliver Hirschbiegel
   PG-13   2008   1hr 39min
Sin City
   R   2005   2hr 4min
Licence To Kill
Special Edition
Director: John Glen
   PG   2002   2hr 13min
The Hunt for Red October
Director: John McTiernan
   PG   1998   2hr 14min
The Dark Knight
Widescreen Single-Disc Edition
   PG-13   2008   2hr 32min
Patriot Games
Special Collector's Edition
Director: Phillip Noyce
   R   2003   1hr 57min

Member Movie Reviews

Edna H. (tessiss) from FRANKLINVILLE, NC
Reviewed on 11/27/2015...
absolutely love this show so glad i have it to watch over an over again
2 of 2 member(s) found this review helpful.

Movie Reviews

A Little family gratitude for all your kind reviews
Richard Lees | Altadena, CA USA | 05/28/2004
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Hello All
I was just wandering through amazon and came upon this section and was just delighted to find "A&C meet Frankenstein" getting such nice compliments.
I would like to let you all know that my father Robert Lees and his writing partner and an old family friend, Freddy Rinaldo, wrote this film.
Freddy is no longer with us but my father is still, all of 92 years old, and is thrilled that after all these years you all like the film.
A little addenda:
You all must remember that A&C were essentially radio comedians,
and it was from his training in radio that Costello had the bad habit of coming unglued if he didn't consistantly get laughs from the crew for each gag each take, no matter how many takes were involved in getting a scene right.. For him the crew was a live audience, so if he didn't take the house down, he would put in another piece of business and reinvent the scene on the spot until he did - and he was very inventive! I don't know how successfull they were, but they tried to take him aside and explain how important it was to actually follow the script!! Dad said that Lugosi enjoyed this aspect of Costello very much although I'm not so sure whether the director did, or the writers either for that matter.
Both Dad and Fred respected the "horror/terror" genre in literature very much noting to me when I was younger how complex and interesting the form had become in the hands of writers like Dunsynane Tolstoy Lovecraft Saki,or Poe to name a few.
Tolstoy wrote some strange and luminous things in this old form, once a short story about a Vampyre.
But in those days and by the time Universal Studios got through exploiting it all, "The Wolfman meets Dracula, meets Frankenstein,meets the Mummy, meets the Andrews Sisters" well, lets just say that the bloom was well off the rose.....
And so the object for them was not to parody the genre (at least the serious part) but to parody what Universal Studios had by this time done to the genre....
One of my favorite parts in the film is that sublimely dysfunctional chase scene at the end.
And its true, they had a blast writing the movie."
Far and away the best Abbott & Costello Horror-Comedy
Lawrance M. Bernabo | The Zenith City, Duluth, Minnesota | 06/16/2001
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Lou Costello was always the master of strangulated, speechless terror, so putting Abbott & Costello in a movie with the Wolfman, Dracula and the Frankenstein Monster was inspired. Getting Lon Chaney, Jr., Bela Lugosi and Glenn Strange to play the Terror Trio was just icing on the cake. This time around Bud and Lou play Chick Young and Wilbur Gray, a pair of railroad baggage clerks in LaMiranda, Florida, who have to deliver two large crates to MacDougal's House of Horrors. Inside are Dracula and the Frankenstein Monster, but of course they escape. To make things worse, Wilbur's beautiful girlfriend, Sandra Mornay (Lenore Aubert), is really a mad scientist who wants to put Wilbur's brain in the Monster. Fortunately, Lawrence Talbot (Chaney) has arrived from Europe on the trail of the monsters. It is rather amazing how long this film goes with Wilbur being the only one to spot the monsters. The comedy in this movie is something of a departure for the comedy team, because it relies more on situational humor and not as much on the "Who's On First" word play. The scene pantomime scene with Lou on the Monster's lap is great, as is the final chase scene with the boys encountering one monster after another. "Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein" is the first and the best of the boy's comic team-ups, which does not deserve the reputation it has in some quarters for having made the Universal monsters creatures of ridicule. That might be true of later Abbott & Costello monster comedies, but the charge would be truer of "House of Dracula" than this film, which has the same respect for the monsters as does "Young Frankentstein." Trivia Note: While filming the scene where the Monster throws Sandra through the lab window, Strange was knocked over and broke his ankle. Chaney, who had played the Monster in "Ghost of Frankenstein," volunteered to step in and once again don the makeup and he is the one who re-shot the scene that appears in the movie."
Lugosi, Chaney Jr. and A & C at their best.
Christopher J. Jarmick | Seattle, Wa. USA | 04/16/2001
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Abbott and Costello's best known and perhaps best film has them meeting Lon Chaney Jr. as the Wolfman, then Bela Lugosi as Dracula, then Glenn Strange as Frankenstein and then. . . . The plot revolves around the idea that the perfect new brain for the Monster should be a simple one -on that's easy to control. Lou Costello's is simple enough. The slapstick begins when Bud and Lou refuse to believe Larry Talbot (Lon) is the wolfman. The best non-monster bits are variations on what Bud and Lou did in the still funny, Hold That Ghost. You will note that Dracula can be seen in mirrors and that he would not have really died from a long fall (that's not being left out in the sun or getting a stake in the heart). But who cares, this is a silly, enjoyable slapstick that gives us both Lon Chaney Jr. and Bela Lugosi doing a wonderful job acting straight against the boy's antics. Glenn Strange is the Monster. Vincent Price does a cameo. (1948 - Directed by Charles Barton)."