Search - Chronos on DVD


Chronos
Chronos
Director: Ron Fricke
Genres: Kids & Family, Special Interests, Educational, Documentary
UR     1997     0hr 43min

Taking the familiar conventions of time-lapse cinematography to a transcendent level of artistic achievement, filmmaker Ron Fricke circled the globe to make Chronos, a stunning 70-millimeter time-lapse tour of natural and ...  more »

     
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Movie Details

Director: Ron Fricke
Creators: Ron Fricke, Alton Walpole, Jeffrey Kirsch, Mark Magidson, Preston M. Fleet, Steven Marble, Constantine Nicholas, Genevieve Nicholas
Genres: Kids & Family, Special Interests, Educational, Documentary
Sub-Genres: 7-9 Years, 10-12 Years, Family Films, Health, Educational, Documentary
Studio: Simitar Ent.
Format: DVD - Color
DVD Release Date: 11/19/1997
Release Year: 1997
Run Time: 0hr 43min
Screens: Color
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaDVD Credits: 1
Total Copies: 0
Members Wishing: 5
MPAA Rating: Unrated
Languages: English
See Also:

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Movie Reviews

From Some of The Fathers of Wordless Narrative Film
Nicholas Croft | New York | 03/13/2004
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Released in 1985, "Chronos" is a forty-minute long "visual-music journey". It is a Presentation of the Reuben H. Fleet Space Theater of San Diego, California and S.E.M. Lagode, Paris, France."Chronos" was filmed on location at over sixty sites around the globe. Images of significant natural beauty, architectural complexity, iconic historical sculpture and various panoramic cityscapes were captured on 70mm film using mostly slow motion and time lapse cinematography.The wordless narrative structure of the work primarily attempts to convey feelings of reverence and appreciation for the breath-taking subject matter. In addition, it also suggests states of significant anxiety experienced as a consequence of the pace and complexity of modern urban life.Electronic music, composed and performed by Michael Stearns, is thoroughly integrated with the considered, slowly paced editing of Alton Walpole and Ron Fricke. Image and sound interpenetrate one another to suggest and convey the eloquent wordless scenario, which was conceived by both Constantine and Genevieve Nicholas.Having begun as cinematographer for director Godfrey Reggio's film "Koyaanisqatsi", we see with "Chronos" that Ron Fricke helped to sow the visual and conceptual seeds of wordless narrative film. This medium finally bore satisfying fruit with 1992's feature length work "Baraka". "Chronos", however, remains as essential viewing. By this passionate evidence of Mr. Fricke's ongoing struggle, we see that their is, at last, some sign of harmonious life beyond the scenario of Godfrey Reggio's dire trilogy."
Good, but not as good as Baraka...
Steve DeVore | Forida, USA | 07/28/2005
(4 out of 5 stars)

"For those who loved the Qatsi Trilogy and Baraka, this is a welcome addition to your collection. It's completely time-elapse cinematography which features some compelling locations, particularly the interior of the Vatican and the Pyramids at Giza. It's a little shorter in length than the other films I mentioned above, and in my opinion the music, with its eerie synthesized tones dates the film (circa 1984), but it's worth the very affordable price the disc is retailing for now. This special collector's edition DVD also includes some interesting interviews with the crew about their experiences during the making of the film, and the groundbreaking camera that was invented specifically for this project.
All in all, if you're a fan of Baraka and the Qatsi Trilogy or just time-elapse photography then you will certainly appreciate this early contribution to it's genre."
A visual and aural treat!
David Rajter | West Hollywood | 12/27/1998
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Originally released as an IMAX film in the mid-80s, Chronos on DVD unfortunately can not match the power of the IMAX experience. But really; what TV can compete with a 5-story-high screen? I saw the film three times in IMAX and each time I saw something new and amazing. I couldn't wait to get this film on DVD. Any shortcomings the Chronos DVD has are related to the size and clarity of the image as displayed on a television, not the film's content. The images of earthly constructions both natural and man-made are drop-dead-gorgeous, and the music -- a nonstop electronic instrumental score -- is mesmerizing. At roughly 45 minutes in length, you'll not want it to end. The disc has a spare and clunky interface and no special features, but who cares? Chronos is a wonder that I find myself watching again and again."
Give us MORE BLU-RAY FRICKE !!!!
ZAHZAH | MISSION VIEJO, CA USA | 05/11/2008
(5 out of 5 stars)

"I saw this when IMAX was brand new (last century) and was blown away by the scope and beauty of the piece. I was so happy to get it on DVD (I had VHS,too). But this Blu-Ray version is definatly the best! I'll admit, while it doesn't look as "perfect" as say, "Cars" on BD, it is very much VERY WATCHABLE and only the very pickiest of video geeks would be distracted by the PRACTICALLY NON-EXISTANT grain, outline or color uneveness. A much better transfer than I expected, near perfect, especially considering the age of the film. The DRS company did a fine job.
As far as the film itself, this is a "Bolero". Not intended for ADD viewers or fast food consumers. This is art, not product. It's Fricke's first major film (that I'm aware of). It's a beautiful exploration of the passing of time with unpresidented cinematography. Films like this are why I got my big screen hi-def TV and BD player. Other movies are fun, and look great, it's true, but Fricke's work a whole different world."