Search - Extremely Dangerous on DVD

Extremely Dangerous
Extremely Dangerous
Actors: Juliet Aubrey, Sean Bean, Anthony Booth, Ralph Brown, Nigel Clauzel
Genres: Action & Adventure, Indie & Art House, Drama, Mystery & Suspense
UR     2002     3hr 20min


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Movie Details

Actors: Juliet Aubrey, Sean Bean, Anthony Booth, Ralph Brown, Nigel Clauzel
Creators: Peter Middleton, Luke Dunkley
Genres: Action & Adventure, Indie & Art House, Drama, Mystery & Suspense
Sub-Genres: Espionage, Indie & Art House, Drama, Mystery & Suspense
Studio: Bfs Entertainment
Format: DVD - Color
DVD Release Date: 06/25/2002
Release Year: 2002
Run Time: 3hr 20min
Screens: Color
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaDVD Credits: 1
Total Copies: 0
Members Wishing: 4
MPAA Rating: Unrated
Languages: English

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Movie Reviews

An Enjoyable British Suspense Thriller (4.5 stars)
Tiggah | Calgary, Alberta Canada | 06/02/2002
(4 out of 5 stars)

"Extremely Dangerous is a 1999 British suspense thriller starring (and indeed created for) Sean Bean (Sharpe, Catherine Cookson's The Fifteen Streets, James Bond's Golden Eye). Bean plays Neil Byrne, a man convicted of the horrific slaying of his wife and child at their home in Manchester. Having spent a couple of years in prison, Byrne has been granted a transfer to a different prison. It is during the train journey to the new prison that Byrne manages to escape, jumping off the train. Now a fugitive, Byrne (who claims to be innocent) returns to Manchester, ostensibly to discover what really happened and who set him up (and why), and it is this process of discovery, together with the curve balls, pit falls, twists and turns that occur along the way, that comprise this 200-minute story. The opening sequence (ie. the escape from the train en route to a prison) and the initial premise (ie. a man accused of slaying his wife and child) is very similar to that of the Harrison Ford film entitled The Fugitive. Whether or not the rest of the show is in essence a remake of The Fugitive or not, I cannot say, as it's been years since I saw the latter film. With a mix of gangsters and government agents, in addition to the police, this is a suspense drama with a good storyline (of which I shall say no more, as I don't wish to give anything away). It requires close attention, as there is some subtlety in the method of presentation, with the viewer occasionally having to make connections that are not explicitly spelled out for him or her. Even with close attention paid, it is still a series which benefits from repeated viewings. The series is split into four 50-minute episodes. Initially, I watched it over four evenings, but I strongly suggest viewers watch it over no more than two evenings (at most) in order to keep the characters and plot straight.Apart from Sean Bean, the show also stars Juliet Aubrey (Catherine Cookson's The Moth, Bertie and Elizabeth) as Annie, the daughter of one gangster and girlfriend of another. Though this is a drama, there is some welcome comic relief (of a very dry and ironic nature) provided by the Pakistani owner of a mini-cab agency (played by Nitin Ganatra) with whom Byrne finds employment. Personally, my favourite scenes are those between Bean and Ganatra.All in all, this was an enjoyable mini-series, and it is certainly worth checking out if you're a fan of suspense drama in general or of Sean Bean in particular."
Call it a thinking man's Fugitive...
Jrobby | TX | 09/30/2004
(5 out of 5 stars)

"This movie was a very enjoyable surprise. I bought it mainly because I adore Sean Bean and I had heard that this role was actually written for him. I was expecting to see another formulaic thriller (albeit with great scenery), but instead I was treated to an entertaining and intelligent four-hour film. As I said in the title, I consider it the thinking man's Fugitive - same general idea but with so much more depth. I'm ashamed to admit that while I'm on my third or fourth viewing I still don't completely understand all the British accents and some of the finer plot points, but that's okay. This is one movie I plan to watch many, many times. Extremely Dangerous is one of a severe minority of movies that treats the viewer like they have a brain in their heads (gasp!). It doesn't describe everything in minute detail. What a refreshing change from all the summer blockbusters that repeatedly beat you over the head with plot. This movie also is heavy on the characterization. No one-dimensional characters need apply! Neil Byrne, the protagonist, is especially appealing for his multiple layers. This is a man who can do some pretty ruthless things but he still manages to walk that fine line between good guy and villain. I liked the way the characters related to each other in realistic, and often funny and touching ways, without ever striking a false note. Overall, I gave Extremely Dangerous five stars because the writing and story were just superb. Sean Bean does his usual excellent job, not that I would expect anything less. He is entertaining and believable as a man so conflicted and tormented by forces he has no control over. This movie should be required viewing for everyone who calls themselves fans of Sean Bean in particular, or just fans of well-made thrillers in general. Five stars!!"
Sean Bean Rocks the Screen as Usual
Jrobby | 06/15/2004
(5 out of 5 stars)

"As a man falsely accused of something he did not do, Sean Bean, plays the divided man, the angst-ridden man to the fullest. This film was made in part for British TV, it far surpasses ALL American television show of any similar genre. If you have a problem understanding any Englishman or British series it is because you are not use to hearing their voices, and accents and basically do not know the cultural differences between our sister nation. This is what true suspense should be, and unlike American dramas of this nature someone does not die every two seconds with bad dialogue following. It has a darkness and stealth that only a British production can have, as in America dramas of the same kind it is always overkill. There is a unique plot development which is made over the 4 parts of this drama which are pieced together, which is why some other viewer thought this was slow. It was watched in the UK over 4 nights, and had character development, and a real storyline. A gripping and amazing performance by Sean Bean, who it seems, cannot deliver anything else, and is worth every second of viewing to realize the end. He is made for this kind of role. Simply made for it, and not bad on the eyes either."
Extremely Dangerous Extremely Entertaining
M. L. Laney | USA | 11/05/2006
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Well-written, fast-paced thriller, and very well-acted -- all the characters, not just the "stars", have depth and dimension. One of the best-made tv-movies I have ever seen."