Search - Gator King on DVD

Gator King
Gator King
Actors: Antonio Fargas, Jay Richardson, Shannon K. Foley, Michael Berryman, Joe Estevez
Director: Grant Austin Waldman
Genres: Action & Adventure, Drama, Horror, Mystery & Suspense
R     2001     1hr 26min

A ruthless alligator smuggler is chased by a determined environmental activist in this tense thriller filmed in bayou country.Format: DVD MOVIE Genre: HORROR UPC: 603497600724 Manufacturer No: 976007


Movie Details

Actors: Antonio Fargas, Jay Richardson, Shannon K. Foley, Michael Berryman, Joe Estevez
Director: Grant Austin Waldman
Creators: Grant Austin Waldman, Ben Dillard Jr., Bob Bragg, John L. Denk, Laurie Dillard, Leonard Denk
Genres: Action & Adventure, Drama, Horror, Mystery & Suspense
Sub-Genres: Action & Adventure, Drama, Horror, Mystery & Suspense
Studio: Rhino Theatrical
Format: DVD - Color
DVD Release Date: 05/22/2001
Release Year: 2001
Run Time: 1hr 26min
Screens: Color
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaDVD Credits: 1
Total Copies: 0
Members Wishing: 0
MPAA Rating: R (Restricted)
Languages: English

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Movie Reviews

Nary A Fresh Idea On Hand To Dilute Bad Taste.
rsoonsa | Lake Isabella, California | 01/22/2007
(1 out of 5 stars)

"Typical of most Rhino Home Video releases, this resolutely uninteresting work provides only an occasional snippet of skill as its patterned plot advances towards a predictable climax. At Santos Lobilita's mid-Florida restaurant, the Crocodile Club, freshly slaughtered alligator meat and innards are the principal theme items upon the establishment's menu, the animals being captured and transported under heavy sedation from a reserve in mainland China to the United States, where Lobilita has them imprisoned, although he steadfastly claims that his main purpose is cross breeding, to restore what has become an endangered species, with a stateside phylum. An environmental activist, Maureen McCormick (Shannon K. Foley) comes upon a site where Lobilita is abandoning the slain animals and, in spite of opposition from a senator and from the local corrupt sheriff (Joe Estevez), Maureen refreshes her long-standing campaign against Santos whose treatment of the alligators is cruel and blatantly self-serving. Her efforts are abetted by a former boyfriend, wildlife Ranger Ron (Jay Richardson), whose attempts at apprehending Santos while a member of the sheriff's department were dashed by his supervisor, but who has continued looking for a means of bringing the self-styled "Gator King" to justice. While Ron and Maureen are rekindling their love affair, trouble awaits them due to the resolve of evil Lobilita to allow no interference in his plans to become a highly successful saurian specialized restaurateur. The film is shabbily composed, the direction tepid, with a screenplay so weakly constructed that a rather less than accomplished cast must fend for itself within sequences that are generally underwritten, as the players' ad libbing serves merely to suggest a need for a stronger hand at the helm. Antonio Fargas performs unsuccessfully as Gator King, his acting limitations prominent amid the surfeit of chaos that the plotline becomes, with only Richardson, a veteran of similar substandard fare, actually managing to create his part. Looping and synching are not done well, although the post-production sound efforts show improvement as the film advances; however, the same cannot be said of the editing, choppy throughout this drab affair wherein a shortfall of scenario logic is exacerbated by poor production values. A Rhino DVD package is of uneven quality that includes a very rough skipping segment, while offering no extras for a movie that simply follows a recipe that is obviously pointed towards the provision of mindless entertainment, yet does not manage to do even that."