Search - Harlem Double Feature: Junction 88 (1947) / The Black King (1932) on DVD


Harlem Double Feature: Junction 88 (1947) / The Black King (1932)
Harlem Double Feature Junction 88 / The Black King
1947
Actor: ""Pigmeat"" Markham
Director: D. Bud Pollard George P. Quigley
Genres: Comedy, Musicals & Performing Arts
NR     2006     1hr 30min

Harlem Double Feature: All black cast comedy musical featuring top swing and novelty acts / A con-man declares himself ""The King of Black America"" and leads a ""Back-To-Africa"" political party.

     
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Movie Details

Actor: ""Pigmeat"" Markham
Director: D. Bud Pollard George P. Quigley
Genres: Comedy, Musicals & Performing Arts
Sub-Genres: Comedy, Musicals
Studio: Alpha Home Entertainment
Format: DVD - Black and White
DVD Release Date: 09/26/2006
Original Release Date: 09/26/2006
Theatrical Release Date: 09/26/2006
Release Year: 2006
Run Time: 1hr 30min
Screens: Black and White
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaDVD Credits: 1
Total Copies: 0
Members Wishing: 3
MPAA Rating: NR (Not Rated)
Languages: English

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Movie Reviews

A Satire of Marcus Garvey
Andre M. | Mt. Pleasant, SC United States | 11/20/2001
(3 out of 5 stars)

"Black nationalists and those familiar with Black history will not like this film. Essentially, it's the tale of this con-artist named "Charcoal Johnson" who schemes poor and ignorant African-Americans into giving up their loot for a phony "Back to Africa" movement. This is, of course, a satirization of the Marcus garvey movement of the 1920s in which Garvey wanted to establish a Black settlement in Liberia akin to Israel for the Jewish people and was arrested for mail fraud. Today, most who are familiar with Garvey's story feel that Garvey was framed and he is now considered a hero. So this film, with it's porttrayal of Black leadership as imcompetent clowns, will ruffle some feathers.It is interesting to note that going through some old African-American newspapers, Black audiences of 1932 actually enjoyed this film. It would be interesting to the what would happen now if you showed this at, say the Apollo Theater.
It would also be interesting to compare this to 1970s "Cotton Comes To Harlem," which had a similar theme with a contemporary spin."