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Holiday
Holiday
Actors: Katharine Hepburn, Cary Grant, Doris Nolan, Lew Ayres, Edward Everett Horton
Director: George Cukor
Genres: Comedy, Drama
NR     2006     1hr 35min

Johnny Case (Cary Grant), a free-thinking financier, has finally found the girl of his dreams ' Julia Seton (Doris Nolan), the spoiled daughter of a socially prominent millionaire ' and she's agreed to marry him! But when ...  more »

     

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Movie Details

Actors: Katharine Hepburn, Cary Grant, Doris Nolan, Lew Ayres, Edward Everett Horton
Director: George Cukor
Creators: Franz Planer, Al Clark, Otto Meyer, Everett Riskin, Donald Ogden Stewart, Philip Barry, Sidney Buchman
Genres: Comedy, Drama
Sub-Genres: Romantic Comedies, Cary Grant, Love & Romance, Classics
Studio: Sony Pictures
Format: DVD - Black and White,Full Screen - Subtitled
DVD Release Date: 12/05/2006
Original Release Date: 06/15/1938
Theatrical Release Date: 06/15/1938
Release Year: 2006
Run Time: 1hr 35min
Screens: Black and White,Full Screen
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaDVD Credits: 1
Total Copies: 0
Members Wishing: 14
MPAA Rating: NR (Not Rated)
Languages: English
Subtitles: English, Spanish, French, Portuguese, Korean

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Movie Reviews

Katharine Hepburn and Cary Grant in the "other" Barry play
Lawrance M. Bernabo | The Zenith City, Duluth, Minnesota | 07/25/2003
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Katharine Hepburn made three films in a row with Cary Grant when she brought her career back after being branded "Box Office Poison." The pair had first made "Sylvia Scarlett" together in 1936, the infamous film where Hepburn's character pretended to be a boy. In 1938 they made the classic screwball comedy "Bringing Up Baby" with director Howard Hawks and in 1940 Hepburn returned to stardom and Jimmy Stewart won an Oscar for "The Philadelphia Story." The latter had been a play specifically written for Hepburn by Philip Barry. In between these two classic films, #97 and #51 respectively on AFI's Top 100 Film of all-time, Hepburn and Grant did "Holiday," another film based on a Barry play. Hepburn had been the understudy for Hope Williams in the original 1928 Broadway production and it was the way she picked up a glass in her screen test of a scene from the play that inspired director George Cukor to cast the young actress in her debut film "A Bill of Divorcement." Now, five years later, he would direct her in the second movie version.The story begins with us meeting Johnny Case (Grant), an engaging young man with some interesting ideas about life. At Lake Placid he met Julia Seton (Doris Nolan), fell in love, and proposed to her. Coming to New York City to meet her family, he arrives at a mansion and is shocked to learn that his beloved is one of THE Setons. Julia's father (Henry Kolker) is not sure what to think of his daughter's intended, but Julia's rather unconventional sister, Linda (Hepburn) thinks Johnny is wonderful. The problem is that Johnny's big plan is to make his fortune when he is young and then retire (i.e., go on a "holiday"), returning to work again when he gets older, which is heresy to old man Seton. He and Julia will try to teach Johnny the error of his ways, while Linda offers her support. Helping to balance the odds for Johnny are his friends, Nick (Edward Everett Horton) and Susan Potter (Jean Dixon), the chief members of his fan club. Linda tries to keep Johnny and Julia together, but it seems she is the only one in the Seton household who appreciates Johnny on his own terms."Holiday" had been filmed in 1930 by Edward H. Griffith with Ann Harding as Linda, Mary Astor as Julia, and Robert Ames as Johnny. Edward Everett Horton played Nick Potter in that version as well, although his wife was played by Hedda Hopper. The screenplay for the 1938 version was done by Donald Ogden Stewart and Sidney Buchman, and it was primarily Stewart who punched up the script version of Barry's revolt against the stuffed-shirts of the world with smart and literate dialogue (Stewart had played the Nick Potter role on Broadway). The result was that the production ended up with some nice ensemble work. Hepburn was under contract to RKO at the time, but bought herself out of her contract to do this film with Cukor at Columbia. Her performance was arguably the most simple and straightforward of any she had done in films up to that point, with all of the pretense and mannerisms stripped away, and the scene where she compares her angular face, with those famous cheekbones, to that of a toy giraffe, is one of the most endearing shots in her film career. Granted, "Holiday" is not going to end up on the AFI's list of Top 100 Films like "Bringing Up Baby" and "The Philadelphia Story," but it is still an enjoyable, solid little filme in which the two stars actually get to do some acrobatics."
The Battle of The Banter--Hepburn and Grant Make This A "Hol
K. Harris | Las Vegas, NV | 10/19/2006
(5 out of 5 stars)

"There was a big controversy earlier this year with "The Cary Grant Box Set" which is a great collection in its own right. Many people were upset that it included the first release of "Holiday" which was new to DVD (unlike the other films in the collection), but no stand alone disc was being offered. Well, good news. If all you wanted was "Holiday" and you held out, here it comes ten months later.

Now, I've always had a soft spot for "Holiday." It hasn't achieved quite the classic status as a couple of other Hepburn and Grant pairings--"The Philadelphia Story" and "Bringing Up Baby"--but I actually think that works to its advantage. I might get into trouble for this, but I somewhat prefer this to the more antic "Bringing Up Baby" (Don't shoot me, I know it's a great film too).

Cary Grant plays a carefree soul that becomes engaged to a millionaire's spoiled, socialite daughter. He is expected to take life more seriously and responsibly--but that's not necessarily in his master plan. Grant, as always, is charming--the quips and physicality that were his trademark are used to good effect here. Katherine Hepburn, as the girl's sister, is obviously a better match for him! Hepburn uses her rapid fire delivery and plays smart and wry better than anyone else in her era. Of course, Grant and Hepburn have great chemistry and it's a joy to see these two masters banter. There's plenty of slapstick, but part of "Holiday"'s charm is that it balances this with real romance. It's funny and sweet.

Any fan of Grant, Hepburn, director George Cukor, classics and/or screwball comedy needs to check this film out. It'll make you smile. KGHarris, 10/06."
Probably Hepburn's best romantic comedy...
Abhimanyu Katyal | San Francisco, CA USA | 01/23/1999
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Not as zany as Bringing Up Baby, or as ultimately offensive as The Philadelphia Story (which started the disappointing trend of humilitaing Hepburn's independence, eccentricity and intelligence by her usually uninteresting, conservative and 'down-to-earth' 'a woman must be a woman' leading men). Holiday allows Hepburn to be herself and celebrates her independence instead of making it a laughing matter. Her leading man, (Hepburn's finest co-star, Cary Grant), falls in love with her for herself, she is not 'reformed' or pulled down to earth as she inevitably was in her Spencer Tracy movies, where one was always made to feel that she was funny, but ultimately not a woman until tracy put her in her place, at his feet.

Lew Ayres, Henry Daniell and Edward Everett Horton give fine supporting performances. This movie really is a must-see. Hepburn and Grant have an infectious, sometimes unabashedly sexual, chemistry. Its Hepburn playing herself (or the image one has come to identify with her). She is also less eager to irritate and steal scenes. She lets the script do its job. She also never looked better (except in Woman of the Year, and The Lion in Winter).

Watch it!"
My Favorite Movie
Lawrance M. Bernabo | 12/13/1998
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Holiday is the antithesis of Bringing Up Baby. Both movies have Grant and Hepburn. Both are comedies. Both are artistic works of geniuses. Holiday was made less than a year after Bringing Up Baby. Yet, they are as different as day and night, with Holiday being night. Bringing Up Baby is a bright romp, cheerful and energetic. Holiday is pleasant; the comedy results from witty dialogue rather than screwball physical comedy; the subtle acting is brilliant. It seems to be a darker comedy about human nature. The characters seem to have matured, from the flighty Susan Vance and the confused David Huxley, to a mature Linda Seton and a confident Johnny Case. The plot, too, is subtle, human, and down-to-earth. To summarize it is to be unfaithful to the movie. Holiday is my favorite movie. Not only that. Holiday is a story told to me by two dear friends."