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Homage to Chagall
Homage to Chagall
Actors: Jean Gascon, James Mason, Joseph Wiseman
Director: Harry Rasky
Genres: Special Interests, Educational, Musicals & Performing Arts, Documentary
NR     2002     1hr 28min


     
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Movie Details

Actors: Jean Gascon, James Mason, Joseph Wiseman
Director: Harry Rasky
Creators: Kenneth W. Gregg, Harry Rasky, Arla Saare
Genres: Special Interests, Educational, Musicals & Performing Arts, Documentary
Sub-Genres: Art & Artists, Educational, Musicals & Performing Arts, Biography
Studio: Kino Video
Format: DVD - Color
DVD Release Date: 12/03/2002
Original Release Date: 06/19/1977
Theatrical Release Date: 06/19/1977
Release Year: 2002
Run Time: 1hr 28min
Screens: Color
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaDVD Credits: 1
Total Copies: 0
Members Wishing: 3
MPAA Rating: NR (Not Rated)
Languages: English
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Movie Reviews

Homage to Chagall
John Farr | 07/03/2007
(5 out of 5 stars)

"A demanding but richly rewarding study of this magnificent artist, who lived and worked in France. A poet and mystic as well as painter, Chagall was a fascinating personality. Here, haunting shots of his work are juxtaposed with readings of the artist's own words by actors Mason and Wiseman. What emerges from Rasky's tribute is a profound portrait of a bona-fide genius, whose goal was to portray the many shades and facets of love."
Not a bad film... just a bad print
D. Pilkey | Casper, WY | 02/03/2007
(2 out of 5 stars)

"The movie was pretty good, with lots of
shots of some of Chagall's most lovely pieces. But the
DVD was very blurry and the colors were VERY faded throughout, making
us feel like we were watching a VHS tape that had been dubbed
from another VHS tape which had been dubbed from another... and another.

One other complaint was the painfully poor dubbing over Chagall's
voice during the Q&A session. It was distracting and amateurish.
The only
thing worse than the dubbing was watching Chagall's wife trying to translate what he was saying into English. She clearly had
no talent for translating, and admitted it. Why didn't the director use subtitles?

"