Search - Homicide- Criterion Collection on DVD


Homicide- Criterion Collection
Homicide- Criterion Collection
Actors: Joe Mantegna, William H. Macy, Ving Rhames
Director: David Mamet
Genres: Indie & Art House, Drama, Mystery & Suspense
R     2009     1hr 42min

In David Mamet?s cinema, nothing is as it seems?so you better know what you?re looking for. Unfortunately, the protagonist of Mamet?s nightmarish urban odyssey Homicide, inner-city police detective Bobby Gold (Joe Mantegna...  more »

     
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Movie Details

Actors: Joe Mantegna, William H. Macy, Ving Rhames
Director: David Mamet
Creators: Roger Deakins, Alaric Jans, Barbara Tulliver
Genres: Indie & Art House, Drama, Mystery & Suspense
Sub-Genres: Indie & Art House, Drama, Mystery & Suspense
Studio: Criterion
Format: DVD - Color,Widescreen
DVD Release Date: 09/08/2009
Original Release Date: 01/01/1991
Theatrical Release Date: 01/01/1991
Release Year: 2009
Run Time: 1hr 42min
Screens: Color,Widescreen
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaDVD Credits: 1
Total Copies: 0
Members Wishing: 25
Edition: Criterion Collection
MPAA Rating: R (Restricted)
Languages: English

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Movie Reviews

It just gets better and better.
John Cobb | Austin, TX | 03/11/2000
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Some David Mamet films have incredible notoriety amongst the literate set (Glengarry Glen Ross, Oleanna, House of Games). His 2 Oscar noms (Wag the Dog, The Verdict) as well as his non-nominated script for The Untouchables have him firmly established with Hollywood's power base as well.For my money, the oft-overlooked Homicide is a true Mamet gem--startling in its genius. Put simply, Homicide is a revealing look at a man's journey into himself. Many will be distracted by the subject matter and tune out, but try to hang on.Joe Mantegna's Bobby Gold is a tough cop who denies his Jewish lineage, until a low priority murder investigation into an aged Holocast survivor forces him to re-evaluate his entire existence. The resulting destruction of the man is cruel and never-ending,...and brilliant. William H. Macy, an until-now bit player, gets a well-deserved promotion to #2 man among the strong supporting cast as Gold's partner and sounding board.The intricacies of the plot, the subtleties of the subtext, as well as the perfunctory Mamet attention to detail may mean a second, or third look is necessary for the viewer to get straight with what's going on------- but take the time, if you can, it just keeps getting better and better."
Dialogue, Plot, Realism -- Where's the DVD??
M. Alley | Dutch Flat, California United States | 06/19/2005
(5 out of 5 stars)

"I too, like many of the other reviewers, am tired of viewing my old and worn VHS version of this movie. This is one of a very few movies I absolutely MUST have in DVD.

A 1991 film, "Homicide" opened the careers of two very important stars: William H. Macy, and Ving Rhames. A very under-rated and seldom-seen Joe Mantegna stars as Detective Bobby Gold, who works for an unstated northeastern police department that looks every bit like Baltimore PD.

The department is after the killer of two cops. The FBI attempts to arrest the suspected killer (in a wonderfully understated, quiet but efficient initial scene) but manages to let him vanish. The heat is on the mayor's office and politics rage. Det. Gold is called a "kike" by one of the mayor's black handlers. In the process of tracking down the cops' killer, Gold manages to get himself involved in the homicide of an older Jewish woman killed in her store. Was she the target of everyday thugs, or the mark of someone continuing the Jewish pogrom?

"We'll bust this big criminal; we'll swagger around." And William H. Macy gives an award winning smile.

From there, all is not as it seems. When Det. Gold begins to investigate all that he believes, he discovers, at the end, that all is, in fact, nothing but irony.

And because I am in law enforcement I know, emphatically, that that which you thought was one thing may, in fact, be clearly another. Something that you never anticipated -- but your mind must be open to receive -- has come to fruition.

This movie is ALL about irony. I'll not be the spoiler. But it is also about dialogue (any Mamet movie is not unlike any Howard Hawks movie -- THAT distinctive a discernation about dialogue!).

And the realization that all is not what it seems.

Because I have seen so many, the death scene of William H. Macy particularly strikes home with me. It is clear, it is abrupt, it is disjointed. "Remember the time?"

I bought this VHS tape in 1992 from Tower, as it was marked $92.95. A wonderful movie then and now."
Where's the DVD!?!?
Gregory Hess | Chicago, IL | 04/15/2004
(5 out of 5 stars)

"This is a great film, and one of the few in the ever-shrinking list of films I want on DVD but are not released. I'm so tired of watching this on a crappy VHS, especially because the photography by Juan Ruiz-Anchia (also of glengarry glen ross)is so beautiful. Attention whomever owns the rights to this! Lets have a DVD!!
-note to amazon.com; it would be nice if there were a link as you have on many other titles to submit my email to be notified when this is available on DVD!"
Mind Games
Gregory Hess | 02/17/2004
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Anyone familiar with David Mamet and his use of the English language will understand his dialogue is poetry and not meant to reflect conversation. This is not a murder mystery, it's not about cops and bad guys. Homicide is about events in our lives that appear to be coincidence but set us in motion to discover ourselves, the meaning of our existence and our purpose."