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Liar Liar
Liar Liar
Actors: Jason Bernard, Jim Carrey, Randall "Tex" Cobb, Amanda Donohoe, Cary Elwes
Director: Tom Shadyac
PG-13     2009

Recovering from the box-office disappointment of The Cable Guy, Jim Carrey gave his fans what they wanted in this good-natured and frequently hilarious 1997 comedy. In a vehicle tailor-made for his verbal and physical anti...  more »

     

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Movie Details

Actors: Jason Bernard, Jim Carrey, Randall "Tex" Cobb, Amanda Donohoe, Cary Elwes
Director: Tom Shadyac
Studio: Universal Studios
Format: DVD - Widescreen
DVD Release Date: 02/27/2009
Release Year: 2009
Screens: Widescreen
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaDVD Credits: 1
Total Copies: 0
Members Wishing: 0
Edition: Collector's Edition
MPAA Rating: PG-13 (Parental Guidance Suggested)
Languages: English
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Movie Reviews

Pants on fire
Dennis Littrell | SoCal | 10/21/2002
(4 out of 5 stars)

"Jim Carrey puts so much energy and pure comedic brilliance into this movie that we hardly noticed how corny and hackneyed was the plot or how wearily didactic was the moral lesson for all fathers who neglect their children for the goddess of success. And really we didn't care. What we loved almost as much as Carrey's rubber mouth and oral blockage (like an overheated boiler fighting not to explode) was the premise: a lawyer that can't lie. Now there's an oxymoron! As Carrey tries to explain to his son Max, lawyers need to lie. Actually he says grownups need to lie, which is a truth that we really do not need to exam too closely here. To laugh at something deeply troubling in our nature is a way of dealing with it.

So the genius of this movie is first the talent of Jim Carrey, but second, for kids who come to the realization of adult mendacity for the first time, it is the discovery of comedy as a way to cope. Why do adults need to lie? is a question that a kid can never figure out, and then by the time he is an adult himself (or actually a teenager), he can no longer comprehend how important the question once was. Call it innocence lost, or the socialization process.

My favorite part of the movie is the courtroom scene with Jennifer Tilly dressed oh so sluttily and her adulterous beaux looking like a model for the cover of a romance novel and Carrey in tatters in his [expensive] suit. Second would be the bathroom scene in which Carrey tries to tear himself apart (and seems to almost succeed). His flapping mouth between the toilet seat and the bowl was inspired. Give some credit to director Tom Shadyac, who managed to steer the vehicle with Carrey at the controls, and to writers, Paul Guay and Stephen Mazur, who wrote some funny lines.

The great comedians totally let themselves go. They are totally on. They go to extremes and beyond. It's like transcending not just the ordinary, but even the imagined. See this obviously for Jim Carrey, one of the great comedic talents of our time, an original who would have delighted Charlie Chaplin with his extraordinary muggings, his blatant audacity and his superb timing."
When The Truth Hurts
Brian E. Erland | Brea, CA - USA | 04/19/2006
(5 out of 5 stars)

"What happens when little Max Reede (Justin Cooper) blows out the candles on his birthday cake and wishes his Dad couldn't lie anymore? Fletcher (Jim Carrey) an unscrupulous lawyer (is there any other kind?) happens to be Max's father. When the birthday wish becomes reality things quickly begin to fall apart for poor Fletcher. After all, what good is a lawyer who can't lie? One thing is certain, Fletcher is about to discover how much the truth can both hurt and heal.

First let me say that I'm not generally a Jim Carrey fan. I find his films inane, vapid and predictable. That along with his excessively loud, over-the-town acting style absolutely drives me crazy. With that said, I must now confess that I've found one exception to that rule. That exception is the unrelentingly hilarious 'Liar Liar.'

All the things that drive me insane about Jim Carrey somehow work wonderfully in this film. It also contains a cast of some of my favorites; Maura Tierney as Fletcher's ex-wife Audrey and Cary Elwes as her new love interest Jerry. I also have to mention the very sexy Krista Allen makes a brief but memorable appearance as the 'girl in the elevator.'"
Liar Liar (HD DVD) Review by Justin Sluss
Justin Sluss | Kingsport, TN USA | 06/21/2007
(3 out of 5 stars)

"The Movie Itself tells the story of how one smooth talking, habitual liar of an attorney "Fletcher Reede" (played by Jim Carey) is forced by his son's birthday wish to have to tell the truth for the next 24 hours. From the second his son "Max" (played by Justin Cooper) blows out his birthday candles until that exact time the next day "Fletcher" (a shady lawyer) is in for 24 hours of telling "the whole truth and nothing but the truth."

This movie for it's time was a huge hit and allowed star Jim Carey to portray a character that looked normal (meaning not have to wear a wig, make-up, etc.) but still allowed him to be able to do his crazy spontaneous comedy type of acting at the same time. This film is not only hilarious and one that is sure to make you laugh but it's also kind of touching the story between the father, son. Obviously not as much so as just downright how funny Jim Carey is in this film. Even with all the other ratings considered this is still a film worth checking out if you have never seen it.

Video Quality on this release is 1080p VC-1 on a 15 gigabyte HD DVD disc. To be a film from 1997 and only on a HD-15 (15gb HD DVD) the video quality here looks really good I think over the original DVD. I for one owned the original `97 DVD release which was actually a 4:3 Fullscreen version, so for me this is almost like night and day but still it's nothing worthy of a 5 star rating. Honestly at times I have to say this is almost just as good as the video transfer for "Bruce Almighty", the other Jim Carey film released the same day on HD DVD. There is some obvious film grain in a few scenes that just hasn't been cleaned up. This translates into some very noticeable film noise in the video presentation from time to time. This is I guess to be expected from a 1997 release like this but I'd have to say the video transfer is an improvement overall and very watchable.

Audio Quality on this release is in Dolby Digital Plus 5.1 @ 1.5Mbps which is an improvement over the original DVD releases' Dolby Digital tracks but still nothing that amazing. It gets 3 stars for being an improvement over the original DVD and really that is why it gets this audio quality rating. The film is primarily dialog driven anyway so it really doesn't matter too much about an improvement in audio quality here. This film is mostly about Jim Carey's character and his hilarious dialog he dishes out once his son has makes the birthday wish. You're most likely going to be laughing so hard at some points I doubt you'll hear too much of the movie's sound over yourself.

Bonus Materials appear to be nothing more than the latest DVD release's ("Collector's Edition") bonus materials ported over and presented in 4:3 standard definition. Really disappointing as you'd expect but let's begin with what all you'll find here. First off there's audio Commentary by Director Tom Shadyac. "Bridging the Comedy Chasm" (16 minutes) starts off to appear to be nothing more than Jim Carey goofing off but soon we get interviews not only from him but also the producer, Director Tom Shadyac and other cast members like the young Justin Cooper. This proves to really showcase Jim obviously more than anybody but it still is worth watching and has some laughs. "Deleted Scene" (4 minutes) is just what you'd expect. Only one deleted scene here obviously but it's a good one if I say so myself. It shows "Fletcher Reede" in a court case (which would have been shown probably near or at the beginning of the film if it had not been deleted) defending this big neanderthal of a criminal against this little old man in a neck brace. It's "Fletcher" at his finest when he could lie. This scene honestly shouldn't have been deleted if you ask me. It's worth 4 minutes of pure laughter, I think anyway. Last we get a very horrible quality (for both video and sound) version of the original Theatrical Trailer to the film. These bonus materials are nothing short of really disappointing as I started this off saying. The only reason this got as high of a rating as it did for bonus materials is the fact Universal not only includes bookmarks now but the ability to make In and Out's to your favorite scenes. If it were not for that, this would have been rated probably 1 or 1 1/2 stars.


-- Review written by Justin Sluss"
Hey Pinocchio, your nose is growing!
Darien Wells | Tulsa, Oklahoma USA | 10/25/2006
(4 out of 5 stars)

"One of the best performances Jim Carrey has given. A very good concept for a film. Funny, refreshing, original and very well done. I felt it could have been a lot better with a little less comedy and a little more drama to get the point across better but still a must see for any Jim Carrey fan. Great acting, casting, screenplay and filming. I recommend it."