Search - The Limey (Special Edition) / Ghost Dog - The Way of the Samurai (Special Edition) on DVD


The Limey (Special Edition) / Ghost Dog - The Way of the Samurai (Special Edition)
The Limey / Ghost Dog - The Way of the Samurai
Special Edition
Actors: Terence Stamp, Peter Fonda, Forest Whitaker, Henry Silva, Lesley Ann Warren
Directors: Jim Jarmusch, Steven Soderbergh
Genres: Action & Adventure, Indie & Art House, Drama, Mystery & Suspense
R     2001

The Limey — Steven Soderbergh's follow-up to his sexy thriller Out of Sight is an equally stylish but far more austere crime drama, a work of memory that mixes flashbacks, flashforwards, and ruminations on the present into ...  more »

     
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Movie Details

Actors: Terence Stamp, Peter Fonda, Forest Whitaker, Henry Silva, Lesley Ann Warren
Directors: Jim Jarmusch, Steven Soderbergh
Creators: Jim Jarmusch, Diana Schmidt, John Hardy, Richard Guay, Lem Dobbs
Genres: Action & Adventure, Indie & Art House, Drama, Mystery & Suspense
Sub-Genres: Crime, Indie & Art House, Drama, Mystery & Suspense
Studio: Live / Artisan
Format: DVD - Color - Closed-captioned
DVD Release Date: 10/23/2001
Release Year: 2001
Screens: Color
Number of Discs: 2
SwapaDVD Credits: 2
Total Copies: 0
Members Wishing: 1
Edition: Special Edition
MPAA Rating: R (Restricted)
Languages: English, French
 

Movie Reviews

Excellent presentation of their craft
Stephanie Partridge | new england | 12/24/2001
(4 out of 5 stars)

"The Limey
Steven Soderbergh tells this tale in an expressive and innovative style. It's not so much the story--estranged English father seeks the truth behind his daughter's suspicious death in sinful Los Angles. But the way each character is presented, then conected. The story unfolds, literally. It is like watching a flower bloom with elapsed-time photography. Terrance Stamp is great. Peter Fonda is more than just window dressing here. And the editor deserves a standing ovation.Ghost Dog
Forrest Whittaker is one of the truly great actors of the day. His work is that of a fine craftsman, and so rare in Hollywood today. The story is interspersed with relative narations from Rashomon by Ryunosuke Akutagawa--tales of Japanese karma (also available on Amazon). The mafia characters I feel ambivalent about. On one hand they lack depth and their laughability detracts from what otherwise is an interesting, thoughtful film. However, they represent a more realistic look at what some aging and less-than-organized crime associates are. These would be the Sopranos rejects. If you can get past the mafia club scene, they fit right in with the story."