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Man of the Century
Man of the Century
Actors: Gibson Frazier, Cara Buono, Ian Edwards, Brian Davies, Susan Egan
Genres: Drama
R     2002     1hr 17min

The sidewalks of New York will never be the same thanks to sharp-dressing, fast-talking newspaperman Johnny Twennies (Gibson Frazier), an ace reporter stuck in the 1920s who's blissfully unaware that he sticks out like a s...  more »


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Movie Details

Actors: Gibson Frazier, Cara Buono, Ian Edwards, Brian Davies, Susan Egan
Genres: Drama
Sub-Genres: Drama
Studio: Image Entertainment
Format: DVD - Black and White,Widescreen,Anamorphic
DVD Release Date: 08/06/2002
Original Release Date: 01/01/1999
Theatrical Release Date: 01/01/1999
Release Year: 2002
Run Time: 1hr 17min
Screens: Black and White,Widescreen,Anamorphic
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaDVD Credits: 1
Total Copies: 0
Members Wishing: 4
MPAA Rating: R (Restricted)
Languages: English

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Movie Reviews

A Real Pleasure
Some Guy | New York | 01/14/2004
(5 out of 5 stars)

"With a little "Purple Rose of Cairo," Buster Keaton, Chaplin, W.S. Van Dyke, and modern Indie sensibility thrown together, "Man of The Century" is a breezy, fast moving winner well cratfed and excellently performed by a steller cast. Frazier's comic timing and language are a riot, and Johnny's rat-at-at old movie jargon is as infectious as this movie's charm. The film is extremely clever in presenting a man out of time, and nicely captures the magic of silent-era comedies and early crime/film noir movies of the 20's and thirties. Clearly the filmmakers know the styles of those films and pay tribute to them. But beneath the gimmick of the premise and style is another surpirse- a fun and spirited story which collects a great group of contrasting characters and delivers a sweet message. Johnny's New York is a bit more romantic and naive than the world of the modern characters he works with, but by the end of this picture, you, like everyone else in the movie, will be glad to join him there. Good stuff, here."
Perfect for fans of the Jazz Age
Jeremy D. Weinstein | Walnut Creek, CA USA | 01/02/2003
(5 out of 5 stars)

"If you enjoy history of the cinema or the Jazz Age, you will enjoy this movie tremendously. It's a lot of fun, and in contrast to formula movies where someone stuck in the past can't make it in the present, he does just fine in our age, thank you, thanks in part to the real world picking up some of the fantasy from the early cinema. The acting, and action, is hilarious. Much that's in here has been done before, in the original, but it all comes together here in a very unique way. The only flaw I found is that although the language and situation "formulae" are from 1928-32, the dress is closer to 1926-27. Highly recommended."
Wish I could talk like that!
Chewthrutherestraints | 04/03/2005
(5 out of 5 stars)

"I loved this movie! The snappy patter and Bobby Short's music
did it for me. I've never particularly been a fan of this or that era but this movie may well make you want to go back to the twenties. I loved that song Nagasaki enough that I ordered a Bobby Short cd. From the other reviews it seems you love or hate this movie. I think it's good enough to watch over and over!"
This movie's the cat's meow, the bee's knees, and on the up
H. Bala | Carson - hey, we have an IKEA store! - CA USA | 07/20/2006
(4 out of 5 stars)

"Man of the Century is an odd little independent film revolving around Johnny Twennies (Gibson Frazier), a man existing out of his time. His mannerisms and sensibilities are that of someone living in the Roaring Twenties. His colloquial speech pattern and cocky, independent persona recall James Cagney and Cary Grant, from Hollywood's golden age. He wears old-fashioned attire (hat included), sends out telegrams, types on an old-school typewriter, dances the Charleston, and is particular to tunes by Irving Berlin and the Gershwins.

Johnny Twennies resides in modern day New York yet is breezily oblivious to our contemporary times. His girlfriend Samantha (Susan Egan) is carrying a torch for him, yet finds herself constantly frustrated because Johnny insists on being a gentleman and refuses to put out. His new photographer partner seems unable to get across to Johnny that he's gay. Trouble comes calling when his newspaper editor gives Johnny one last chance to come up with a scoop before he gives him the bum's rush. Add to that the fact that two hoodlums are hassling him because of a newspaper column...well, it's all enough to give one the heebie-jeebies.

This short, weird film is short on depth, but long on style. I thought it was a blast. It was really fun watching the clash between 1990s NewYork residents (and their modern sensibilities) and the determined obliviousness of the anachronistic Johnny Twennies. The glossy black and white cinematography is apropos to the storyline and looks great. Gibson Frazier, who co-wrote the story, has the 1920s personality down pat, complete with the snappy, rapid-fire patter and jaunty, can-do attitude. Susan Egan has a perfectly pitched performance as Johnny's baffled girlfriend. Sadly, Frank Gorshin (Batman's Riddler) doesn't fare as well as the elderly, decrepit, kinky Roman Navarro, who preys on musical ingenues.

I do agree with several reviewers who suggested this would've improved even more with a shorter running time. It would've been absolute gold as a 20 minute short. Nevertheless, Man of the Century is still definitely worth checking out for the full-on commitment and realization of its wacky premise.