Search - Millennium - The Complete Second Season on DVD


Millennium - The Complete Second Season
Millennium - The Complete Second Season
Actors: Lance Henriksen, Megan Gallagher, Brittany Tiplady, Terry O'Quinn, R.G. Armstrong
Directors: Allen Coulter, Darin Morgan, Dwight H. Little, John Peter Kousakis, Kenneth Fink
Genres: Drama, Science Fiction & Fantasy, Television, Mystery & Suspense
NR     2005     16hr 29min

A former FBI agent moves to Seattle with his family to find some peace only to be recruited by a vigilante justice group called the Millennium Group after they find out that he has supernatural abilities that could help th...  more »

     

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Movie Details

Actors: Lance Henriksen, Megan Gallagher, Brittany Tiplady, Terry O'Quinn, R.G. Armstrong
Directors: Allen Coulter, Darin Morgan, Dwight H. Little, John Peter Kousakis, Kenneth Fink
Genres: Drama, Science Fiction & Fantasy, Television, Mystery & Suspense
Sub-Genres: Drama, Sci-Fi Action, Aliens, Drama, Science Fiction, Mystery & Suspense
Studio: 20th Century Fox
Format: DVD - Full Screen - Dubbed,Subtitled
DVD Release Date: 01/04/2005
Original Release Date: 10/25/1996
Theatrical Release Date: 10/25/1996
Release Year: 2005
Run Time: 16hr 29min
Screens: Full Screen
Number of Discs: 6
SwapaDVD Credits: 6
Total Copies: 0
Members Wishing: 3
Edition: Box set
MPAA Rating: NR (Not Rated)
Languages: English, English, French, Spanish
Subtitles: English, Spanish

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Movie Reviews

Season Two: The Best of Frank Black
Brian A. Dixon | Connecticut, USA | 10/10/2004
(5 out of 5 stars)

"When Glen Morgan and James Wong jointly took over the Executive Producer role for Millennium's second season quite a few changes were planned and subsequently enforced. Morgan and Wong made efforts to deviate from the Serial Killer of the Week pattern, they complicated the yet unexplored history of the mysterious Millennium Group, they introduced a sense of humor to the series, and they brought religion and spirituality more prominently into the scripts.

Morgan and Wong's second season was immediately accused of subconsciously aping The X-Files, of deviating from Chris Carter's original vision for the series. Although these claims are not entirely unfounded, the show's new direction proved to be more of a blessing than a curse. As the second season continued fans found themselves growing more attached to the revitalized Millennium while, at the same time, the diverse episode themes attracted new audience members. The show, episode by episode, became dramatically more complex and bravely more artistic.

Millennium was a series that was continually reinventing itself. It's one of the keys to the strength of the show's drama and to the power of its continuing relevance. Glen Morgan and James Wong held nothing back as their scripts delved unabashedly into a world dominated by demons, angels, dreams, visions, mythology, science, and the triumphant if sometimes troubling human spirit. It is in the episodes of Millennium's second season that the series reached its peak and these discs contain some of Frank Black's most thrilling and unforgettable adventures. (Among them is "The Curse of Frank Black," arguably the most impressive episode the show ever produced.) Even in the twenty-first century this is as good as it gets and there's nothing else like it in the annals of television history."
730 Days Left
William Smith | Fontana, CA United States | 01/05/2005
(5 out of 5 stars)

"(Season III: Sept. 6, 2005!!)

I must say this series really hit its stride with Season II. Season One had its moments but the characters never seemed more than cardboard cut outs (with a few exceptions), here the characters become "people" and that is the defining moment for any series, providing they are lucky enough to get this far.

The Beginning of the End *** - Good episode but doesn't quite match the anticipation set up by the closing of Season One.

Beware of Dog * - One of my least fave episodes. Just improbable and a real mess. The Carpenters intro was interesting though. The people live there with those dogs? Silly. Not so much Sci-fi more like Low-fi.

Sense and Antisense *** - A good episode, not much else to say. A bit over the top.

Monster **** - A real great episode featuring Franks new "partner". She's great, plus the little kid is... a Monster (not to mention a great little actress).

Single Blade of Grass *** - Amy Steel is great, the Indians are overwrought.

The Curse of Frank Black ****.5 - The first ep that really defies the series. Unusual but a must see. Ahh, Jordan dressed as Marge is so cute.

19:19 **.5 - Kind of by the numbers, much like Sense and Antisense.

The Hand of Saint Sebastian ***** - The first fiver of Season Two. GREAT episode that reveals a lot of "the group." A MUST!!

Jose Chung's Doomsday Defense ***** - This may be a love or hate episode because it often borders on humor (and brilliance). This reminds me of Wes Andersons works, like the Life Aquatic, totally surreal, and totally NOT for the masses.

Midnight of the Century ***** - three fivers in a row!!? This is my fave, it is Christmas time and fuses so many different aspects of the show... and they ALL work. If more people had seen this one episode, this show would STILL be on TV.

Goodbye Charlie ** - Has some interesting ideas but seems to fall back on Season Ones need for random serial killers, just kind of `eh'.

Luminary ***** - Nice outdoors ep. Reveals a lot about Catherine and Frank, the ending is a bit odd though, well the near end when they leave Frank out in the woods? Great parallel story with Neptune and Pluto.

Mikado *** - Liked this one. Not loved though. No Catherine and Jordan so the story shifts back to "another criminal", the ending is interesting though. This is "the computer guys" big chance and he was flat.

The Pest House *** - Some good guest star performances do take up some of the slack behind a rather ho-hum (and unclear) story and script. Freddy meets Jason meets Michael Myers. Catherine and Jordan, again, MIA.

Owls **** - Good ep dealing with the `Group'. Flashes of Catherine and Jordan and another solid performance by Lara Means. Great cliffhanger episode. A bit confusing as far as who's who takes away a star. (I must note that at this point in the series it's really interesting to see the original focal point of the show (Franks "power") being an almost "side note" making the characters first and foremost and to me that speaks volumes.

Roosters **** - I'm starting to see why the show failed. Not because of the quality, but because of the pacing. The past 2 episodes have included enough material for at least 6. They seem to be pressing hard about the group, which doesn't bode well for a "typical" TV audience. Even watching these in a sort of rapid-fire format leaves me wondering huh-wha? From time to time. Great, but a bit fast.

Siren **** - Very good guest star performances. Great soundtrack. A great scene of discomfort between Frank, Catherine,... and Lara. A surreal sequence in this is one of the better moments of Millennium, I only took off one star for the rather predictable climax.

In Acadia Ego **** - 5 star performances hindered by a few problems I had with this. Franks lack of sympathy for the guard that was killed and the expression of complete sympathy for convicts on the run. Also, it was unclear to me why Frank let the convict walk into a "suicide by cop." Great message and ending though.

Anamnesis: ** - I like the subject matter, but the performances by the teens involved, and even surprisingly by Catherine and Lara seemed forced and emotionless. Sad too because it was a real great opportunity for Catherine and Lara to go toe to toe and it never really worked.

A Room With a View **** - Silence of the Lambs with a twist. Loved the subject matter and performances but mostly this will be a memorable show for me because of the counselors speech about "Passing through the Numbers". I've thought this same way for years and years. Watch this episode and learn what we have become; more accurately this is who we really are.

Somehow, Satan Got Behind Me ***.5 - I liked this one. One of the "humor-sodes." A bit different, but with a nice direction. The only thing I fault it for is the prime opportunity to interject Frank and many of the Millennium cast into the mix and yet they don't, and the ending didn't feel finished.

The Fourth Horsemen ***** - This is part one of the Season Two finale and while it may seem a bit of a stretch I love the direction of the show, totally cryptic and completely engaging. Cheers to Terry O' Quinn for helping create the series major tension. If this episode doesn't reach you, none of them will.

The Time is Now ***** - Or the beginning of the end, depending on how you look at it. So much to say that I shouldn't. Sadly, I heard about the major spoiler for the ending of this episode in advance, but was still surprised to see it. I kept thinking "No, they wouldn't... would they!?" They did.

Watching the small interview with the shows main components, I'm saddened that so many are on different pages with this second season, that is just about the only disappointing aspect for me... In fact, Glen Morgan and James Wong declined to appear, and that cuts me pretty deep. There must be some sort of major rift but at least I can my piece; Millennium: Season Two is one of the finest seasons in television... ever. I look forward to Season Three, despite what others say about it (I have seen none of it)."
This is who we are...
Anna Maria Martinez | California | 10/22/2004
(5 out of 5 stars)

"...and Season Two of Millennium is, for me, what the series was all about. While Season One blew us away with intense CSI-like drama and plot lines, Season Two gave us more of the behind the scenes mythology that we knew was there is Season One, but never saw.

The relationship between Frank Black and Peter Watts (BTW: Terry O'Quinn deserves tons of credit for playing this role the way he did!) becomes very important to the plot, combine that with the addition of Kristen Kloke (playing Laura) and the revelations about the Millennium Group and this season, in my opinion, becomes one of the best seasons for a television series ever.

Episodes like "Jose Chung's Doomsday Defense" and "Somehow Satan Got Behind Me" bring a bit of "tragic comedy" into play. The episode, "Mikado" shows us how truly awesome Frank's profiler abilities are, and eispdoes like, "Owls," "Roosters," "The Hand of Saint Sebastian," "The Fourth Horseman" and "The Time is Now" explore the Millennium Groups darker side, as well as send chills up the spine of viewers with intense visuals and storylines--some like "The Time is Now" haunt me to this day! The best thing is that all of these episdoes, different as they may be, contribute to the show, they allow it to grow and become something that will entertain us far into the future.

I truly believe this show was way ahead of it's time, and if it were just coming out now, and even though it was different in it's approach to crime-drama, it would rival CSI and all of the other top-rated crime-drama shows each network is developing today.

"
Season two, and Frank's better than ever!
kidnugget | Bakersfield, CA USA | 10/19/2004
(5 out of 5 stars)

"I've already written a rave review of season one, so now I'll add a few notes on season two. Season one of this show is a crime drama with a hint of conspiracy and spiritual darkness. Season, two, however, pulls back the covers and lets you begin to see the real world of Frank Black. Rumors abound that due to sagging ratings, Carter tried some new tricks to pull ratings to the show (a common and necessary evil of Hollywood mainstream television); this may be true, but either way, the changes in season two are wonderful.

In seasons two, Frank's visions begin to make more sense to an audience, and the supernatural plays a much larger part in the story lines. It's less about a retired profiler and more about stemming off the end of the world. We begin to see our first demons and our first hints at the sinister machinations of "The Group."

One Amazon review says that season two panders and plays to comedy. I'm not sure what show this reviewer was watching. I found season two to be at times so brutal it was difficult to watch (in a good way!). As for an occasional comic foray in the series, I think that's called variety, and it is needed in any show. The same feel and the same story arcs week after week are series suicide. By showing a funny glimpse of the Millennial world every now and then, and by making Frank more human, the show gains a broader appeal. It's not grim faced, tight lipped Frank Black the sketch from season one; it's Frank Black the person, now.

Any review that looks at the world of Millennium and X-Files, a world of alien abductions, face-less alien rebels, and demons walking among us to secure the end times and says that the world has become "increasingly fantastic and unbelievable" obviously missed the point of the entire genre. Bring it on. Show us the strange. That's the whole point. We wanted to laugh a bit even in this grim world; we wanted to be shocked and see the demons instead of theorizing about them, we wanted some change and fresh story lines and questions raised about the nature of The Group. And we got it in season two.

If you liked season one, you'll love season two. Actually, if you didn't like season one, you'll like season two also. Trust me.
"