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Modern Marvels - Chrysler Building (History Channel)
Modern Marvels - Chrysler Building
History Channel
Genres: Television, Documentary
NR     2007     0hr 50min

The 1,046-foot Chrysler Building in New York City, erected between 1928 and 1930, was the world's tallest edifice--until the Empire State Building eclipsed it in 1931! Since then, this Art Deco masterpiece has become one o...  more »

     
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Movie Details

Genres: Television, Documentary
Sub-Genres: Television, Documentary
Studio: A&E Home Video
Format: DVD - Color
DVD Release Date: 07/31/2007
Original Release Date: 01/01/2007
Theatrical Release Date: 01/01/2007
Release Year: 2007
Run Time: 0hr 50min
Screens: Color
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaDVD Credits: 1
Total Copies: 0
Members Wishing: 2
MPAA Rating: NR (Not Rated)
Languages: English

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Movie Reviews

The one with the marvelous dome
Jeffery Mingo | Homewood, IL USA | 06/02/2008
(3 out of 5 stars)

"I know the term "Empire State Building" more than I do "Chrysler Building," but visually I would recognize the latter first. This documentary is not afraid to admit that the building was only the tallest in the US for 11 months. Luckily, no worker died in its construction. When I think of the building, I think of its half-ovals. I had no idea it had eagles on it at all. The work does not end with the building's completion; that happened in the middle of the documentary. Getting a 1920s building to be desirable to space renters at the turn of the millenium (sp?) took up a huge chunk of the discussion. When I think of this building, I think of a 1960s Spiderman spinning around it, but the work does not speak about cultural references to the edifice. I must admit that as a Chicagoan, the installment in this series on the Sears Tower kept my attention more than this installment. Perhaps this work would be enjoyed most by New Yorkers."