Search - Mr. Moto's Last Warning on DVD


Mr. Moto's Last Warning
Mr Moto's Last Warning
Genres: Classics
1hr 11min

Peter Lorre will THRILL you as the mysterious hero, Mr. Moto...! Peter Lorre stars as the soft-spoken Japanese sleuth created by John P. Marquand, with the great John Carradine as British agent Danforth. In Port Said on th...  more »

     
3

Larger Image

Movie Details

Creator: Ricardo Cortez, John Carradine Peter Lorre
Genres: Classics
Sub-Genres: Classics
Studio: Front Row Entertainment Inc
Format: DVD - Black and White
Run Time: 1hr 11min
Screens: Black and White
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaDVD Credits: 1
Total Copies: 0
Members Wishing: 0
Subtitles: English

Similarly Requested DVDs

The Shadow Riders
Director: Andrew V. McLaglen
   PG   1998   1hr 40min
   
The Horse Soldiers
Director: John Ford
   NR   2001   1hr 55min
   
Derailed
   R   2003   1hr 29min
   
Barney - Let's Go to the Zoo
   2003   0hr 30min
   
28 Days Later
Widescreen Edition
Directors: Danny Boyle, Toby James
   R   2003   1hr 53min
   
Dora the Explorer - It's a Party
Directors: Arnie Wong, Sherie Pollack
   UR   2005   0hr 30min
   
Defiance
Director: Edward Zwick
   R   2009   2hr 17min
   
My Favorite Brunette
5
   NR   1hr 25min
   
 

Member Movie Reviews

Matt B. from GETZVILLE, NY
Reviewed on 2/9/2011...
A quartet of spies from various backgrounds plan to blow up the French fleet pulling into Port Said, Egypt and thus sabotage the relations between allies France and Britain. Working for the” International Police” rather than dreaded Japanese secret service (as in the novels by John P. Marquand), Mr. Moto (Peter Lorre) follows their trail to break up their ugly plan.

Ricardo Cortez plays the ventriloquist to his Cockney dummy Alf. He bothers his girlfriend Virginia Field by making snide comments through the dummy – why is it movie ventriloquists almost always have creepy relationships with their dummies? George Sanders talks with an unidentifiable accent, but there’s no denying his ability to act smoothly as the urbane heel. Another familiar actor - John Carradine – looks odd in a fake beard but his inimitable voice helps us know it’s him. Virginia Field convinces us with a gutsy performance of a woman with a past who does the right thing. Something athletic and confident about her poise reminds me of a dancer or a swimmer.

Peter Lorre made eight movies in this character between 1937 and 1939. When asked how he was able to keep up such a fearsome pace of work, he said in his mordant way, “I had to take a lot of drugs.” But like Sanders and Field, Lorre screen presence shines.

More a spy movie than a mystery, the plot is sound, the incident sensible, the suspense plausible and the action is exciting.