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Notorious (Single-Disc Edition)
Single-Disc Edition
Actors: Jamal Woolard, Anthony Mackie, Derek Luke, Mohamed Dione, Dennis L.A. White
Director: George Tillman Jr.
Genres: Drama, African American Cinema
R     2009     2hr 2min

Genre: Drama Rating: R Release Date: 21-APR-2009 Media Type: DVD

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Movie Details

Actors: Jamal Woolard, Anthony Mackie, Derek Luke, Mohamed Dione, Dennis L.A. White
Director: George Tillman Jr.
Creators: Edward Bates, George Paaswell, Mark Pitts, Robert Teitel, Sean 'P. Diddy' Combs, Cheo Hodari Coker, Reggie Rock Bythewood
Genres: Drama, African American Cinema
Sub-Genres: Drama, African American Cinema
Studio: Twentieth Century Fox
Format: DVD - Color,Widescreen - Subtitled
DVD Release Date: 04/21/2009
Original Release Date: 01/01/2009
Theatrical Release Date: 01/01/2009
Release Year: 2009
Run Time: 2hr 2min
Screens: Color,Widescreen
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaDVD Credits: 1
Total Copies: 5
Members Wishing: 0
MPAA Rating: R (Restricted)
Languages: English
Subtitles: English, French, Spanish
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Member Movie Reviews

Suzanne B.
Reviewed on 6/13/2009...
Surprisingly good film about the rapper's life and death. Raises questions about how it all went down. I would give this NC-17, not R. Very graphic.
1 of 1 member(s) found this review helpful.

Movie Reviews

Great Music Biopic For the Hip Hop Genre
T Boz | USA | 03/15/2009
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Saw this when it was in theaters, and was pleasantly surprised it did not disappoint. What put this film over the top was the excellent casting; the characters of Biggie, Faith Evans, Lil Kim, and even Tupac and Voletta Wallace (played by Angela Bassett) made this a believable account of what happened between these intersecting lives that left such a mark on musical history, and ultimately, a tragedy. You really felt for young Christopher as he grew up in the 80's admiring the rising hip hop stars of the day, and perfecting his rhyming skills on the street, while trying to avoid the perils of drugs and crime. What I liked most about this film was the humanity they brought to his character, making him seem like more of a real person than a musical icon. He wasn't perfect by any stretch of the imagination, but he was trying to be a good person, no matter what obstacles life threw in his way. Ultimately this is a tale of a flawed individual, as we all are, who was lucky enough to raise himself out of the conditions he found himself in, and tried to make his mark on history, which ultimately, he did."
Well-cast, beautiful cinematography, very slick editing and
Dennis A. Amith (kndy) | California | 04/24/2009
(5 out of 5 stars)

"The death of Christopher "Notorious B.I.G." Wallace in 1997 was a big shock to hip hop fans around the world.

The events preceding his death was well-known, well-documented in the media in regards to the major riff with the East Coast vs. West Coast hip hop feud.

Considered as one of the greatest hip hop artists ever, "Notorious" is a biopic that documents the life of Christopher "Notorious B.I.G." Wallace and grossing over $43 million worldwide.

The film was directed by George Tillman, Jr. ("Soul Food" and "Men of Honor") and a screenplay co-written by Reggie Rock Bythewood and Cheo Hodari Coker (the author of "Unbelievable: The Life, Death, and Afterlife of the Notorious B.I.G.") which showcases and celebrates the rapper's life.


The NOTORIOUS Unrated Director's Cut Collector's Edition Blu-ray Disc is presented in widescreen format (2.55:1 ration) with English 5.1 DTS HD Master Audio and Spanish 5.1 Audio with French and Spanish subtitles. English subtitles will also be available for the deaf and hard of hearing.

Picture quality for "Notorious" looked amazing as you can see the skin pores quite clearly on high definition but what is most amazing is how New York was captured on film. From the beauty of the city to its gritty side, the level of vibrancy in the colors, beautiful cinematography and wonderful editing really made this biopic come alive.

As for the audio, audio is presented in English 5.1 DTS HD Master Audio. Audio is crystal clear during the dialogue department but its even more exciting during the musical segments as your speakers really showcase the drum and bass, giving your subwoofers a workout. From the performance of "Party & Bulls***t"to the overall atmosphere with the crowd going wild, the soundtrack is well done!


The "Notorious" Blu-ray Disc is jam-packed with special features. The 2-Disc Blu-ray version includes a digital copy and also the unrated director's cut and theatrical version of the film. Special features included are:

* Commentary with Director George Tillman, Jr., Co-Screenwriter Reggie Rock Bythewood, Co-Screenwriter Cheo Hodari Coker and Editor Dirk Westervelt - This commentary features the filmmaking side of "Notorious". Really well-done and there is a picture-in-picture segment featuring the screenplay and interviews with the talent.
* Commentary with Producer/Biggie's Mom Voletta Wallace, Producer/Biggie's Co-Manager Wayne Barrow and Producer/Biggie's Co-Manager Mark Pitts - This is a very unique commentary. For one, Ms. Wallace was very instrumental for the film but what I enjoyed abut this commentary and hearing his co-managers talk is them actually chiming in what was different in terms of the real Chris Wallace and the version portrayed on the film. Small situations such as when Chris goes to prison for the first time, his first and only call is to his mother and for Chris, panicking he cusses. His mother was clear that her son knew better than to cuss around her and never did. So, that was quite interesting to hear.
* Behind the Scenes: "Making of Notorious" Featurette - (27:22) Interviews with Voletta Wallace, Director Frank Tillman, Jr., Christopher Wallace's friends and the talent. Learning on how the casting director's searched for the right talent to play the certain roles for the film. Behind-the-scenes footage of the planning for the film from casting auditions to how authentic the crew wanted to make this film and making sure New York during that time was captured correctly. Interviews with the actual people close to Biggie and the people portraying them.
* I Got a Story to Tell: The Lyrics of Biggie Smalls - (9:28) How Notorious B.I.G. was an icon. Interviews with radio DJ's, magazine interviewers, friends and family of Biggie explaining to the viewer how great a guy he was and how humorous he is.
* NOTORIOUS Thugs: Casting the Film - (9:05) Interviews with the casting directors Twinkie Byrd and Pamela Frazier and how and why they made their final decision in casting the main characters for the film.
* Biggie Boot Camp - (6:48) Interview with Director Frank Tillman, Jr. and how the characters had to go through a boot camp in order to prepare for their roles and make the film as authentic as possible. From acting coach to the live performances.
* Anatomy of a B.I.G. Performance - (5:15) Interview with Director Frank Tillman, Jr. & Little Cease about getting the details right for Notorious B.I.G. shows. And basing the live footage of the film from the actual recorded live performances. How there was no lip syncing and how the talent had to make the crowd move.
* Party & Bulls**t (never-before-seen footage of the real B.I.G.) - (3:42) Oldschool never-seen-before live footage of Party & Bulls**t.
* The B.I.G. Three-Sixty - A segment featuring the filming of the murder of Notorious B.I.G. near Wilshire Blvd. and Fairfax Ave. A 360 segment which the viewer can go left and right and each section has a video of certain segments that deal with the shooting of the murder scene.

o The Petersen - (1:13) Going behind the scenes of the Petersen Museum for the party that Biggie attended, hours before he was murdered. Interview with producer Trish Hoffman, Wayne Barrow, co-writer Cheo Hodari Coker and Director Frank Tillman, Jr.

o Directing the Last Moments - (2:10) Director Frank Tillman, Jr. discussing how difficult the scene was to shoot.

o It Happened Right Here - (1:23) Interview with Producer/Biggie's Co-Manager Wayne Barrow discussing the spot where Biggie was killed.

o The Petersen Exit - (2:15) Interviews with crew and talent in regards to the scene when Biggie and his friends leave the Petersen Exit minutes before he is killed at the stoplight.

o The Shooting - (4:12) Interview with Director Frank Tillman, Jr., Cheo Hodari Coker and Reggie Rock Bythewood (co-writers) and Producer/Biggie's Co-Manager Wayne Barrow and producer Robert Teitel discussing how difficult it was to shoot the heartwrenching scene and shooting in the actual corner of where it all happened.

o The Impala - (1:12) Interview with Producer/Biggie's Co-Manager Wayne Barrow discussing the Chevy Impala that the killer drove.

o The Unfortunate Violent Act - (1:09) Interview with Reggie Rock Bythewood (co-writer) on how they shot the scene because the investigation to Biggie's death is still ongoing.

o The Window - (1:30) Interview with FX Technician Larz Anderson on how they made the broken glass window affect without firing a bullet.

* Deleted Scenes - (12:13) A total of nine deleted scenes and an extended scene with a brief text introduction to each scene.

o Assassin assembles his gun

o Taking care of business

o Big on his own

o Finding inspiration

o The assassin watches

o In the hotel pool

o East Coast in the house

o After the accident

o The assassin backs up

o Extended Concert: Primo Street Rap

* BD-Live Feature - The Music: get even closer with the music of B.I.G. with this interactive trivia track and tag and track your favorite songs throughout the movie.
* BonusVIEW - Life After Death: Making NOTORIOUS

"NOTORIOUS" was an absolutely, wonderful film and the Blu-ray Disc was magnificent!

What I loved about the film is how much was put into making the film look authentic when it came to the kind of clothes, the type of haircut, the type of vehicles, the live performances and of course, the talents.

The crew's determination to achieve authenticity was just amazing, James Woolard as Christopher Wallace was well-acted and his mannerisms was well-captured. I also thought that it was so touching for Biggie's son, Christopher Jordan Wallace playing his father at a young age. The young man did a great job portraying his father.

Angela Bassett really showcased Voletta Wallace's strength and caring for her son as a single mother and portrayed her quite well with emotion of happiness, sadness, anger, etc. Bassett definitely gave a powerful performance especially capturing the moment when Voletta realized how important her son's music was to his fans.

Derek Luke also portrayed Sean "Puffy" Combs quite well and capturing his mannerisms, especially onstage and doing Puffy's dance moves.

You also have give credit to Biggie's entourage as Dennis L.A. White did a great job as Damion "D-Roc" Butler, capturing the time they were hustling on the streets and then afterward as a friend and being there when he died. Marc John Jeffries as Lil Cease as Biggie's small friend but with a big heart and always there for him. Also, Kevin Phillips as Biggie's manager Mark, did a good job showing his concern and for his sake, as well as his mother's sake, taking care of him.

The ladies in Biggie's life was well played by Antonique Smith as Faith Evans, Amanda Christopher as Keisha and Naturi Naughton as Lil Kim. Antonique having an impressive voice and having grown up listening and singing Faith Evans songs, definitely brought her beauty to the film. Naturi Naughton as Lil Kim was well-cast, especially for the actress showcasing the actual talent's sexiness and how she became the sex-driven hip hop artist. That was quite interesting to know.

Well-cast and again, kudos to the crew for making sure these talents got down the mannerisms of their real counterparts.

Another major positive for the film is the cinematography and editing. Cinematography and capturing New York in a variety of forms from the area Biggie grew up to capturing the buildings and bridges and overall, Brooklyn. Director of Photography Michael Grady ("Wonderland", "Hotel for Dogs", etc.) did a phenomenal job. Editing was also done very well by Dirk Westervelt ("Journey to the Center of the Earth"). Cuts are tight and just the overall amount of editing from capturing New York to the live performances and making sure you feel the energy of the performance was well captured in the final cut.

And last, this film would not be successful without the well-written script by Reggie Rock Bythewood and Cheo Hodari Coker, who knew Biggie Smalls and worked with his family and friends in making sure they got certain parts as accurate as they can. Overall, pacing of the story was just right and made you care for the characters.

If there was anything negative that I found, the film tends to focus on the more positive sides of Christopher Lawrence and less on his well-publicized bad-boy past which he has gotten in trouble for. Aside from the drug dealing, Lawrence has had some major problems in his life with the law that were not shown in the film. But then again, there were so many layers that needed to be covered in the overall film such as his many relations with the women in his life, his best friends, his manager and other performers, if anything, the people who made this film are those who loved the man for what he did for them and the music he created for people. He touched a lot of lives and this film produced by the people most close to him, wanted to celebrate that.

I just can help but be amazed by how much is on this blu-ray disc. You get the original theatrical and unrated director's cut, you get a digital download disc, you get a film showcasing the beauty of New York and the gritty side of the city with amazing picture quality.

Audio quality was just great especially with the music of Notorious B.I.G. and hearing the subwoofer's lower frequency and the bass drum making things sound amazing during the musical segments. Audio is crystal clear and easily understood.

And of course, the Blu-ray features many special features with in-depth footage of the making of this film and getting to learn about the life of Christopher "Biggie" Wallace and also the heartbreaking scenes of his murder and having to shoot those scenes for the film. Also, kudos to the idea of including Voletta Wallace for the commentary segment a reality. Just a nice touch to hear Biggie's mother speak about certain scenes and about her son.

Suffice to say, you're getting your money's worth with this Blu-ray release. Awesome picture quality, magnificent audio and jam-packed with features. I give "NOTORIOUS - UNRATED DIRECTOR'S CUT" a high recommendation and for Biggie fans, this Blu-ray disc is definitely worth having in your collection!"
Not as good as it could've been...
Ciarra Logan | 06/02/2009
(2 out of 5 stars)

"I was overjoyed when I first heard they were making a film about the life of rapper Christopher "Biggie" Wallace. I'm a huge fan of his music, and I thought a biography about the famous rapper was long overdue. However, I don't think the film reached its full potential in essence. It could've been something great, but it settled for mediocrity instead.

Director George Tillman uses lots of flashy, glossy shots and camera angles for each scene. Biggie was a man who grew up as a drug dealer and hustler. Nothing about his life growing up was glamorous or flashy. So I expected a less glossy, more raw approach to the film; especially the scenes of him as a child in Brooklyn. The movie didn't focus on Biggie's trials and hardships as much as they could've. Instead they chose to spend more time focusing on scenes with Biggie in clubs partying, on stage rapping, or in one scene...him getting pleased by 2-3 different women. The film should've cut back on these type of glamorous, luxury driven scenes, and focused more on the story of Christopher Wallace.

Some of the casting was flawed as well. None of the actors looked like the people they portrayed. The worst was Derek Luke's portrayal of Sean "Puffy" Combs. It's bad enough that the actor looked absolutely nothing like him. He was far more attractive. But it's even worse that Puffy took his role as executive producer and made his character in the film out to be a saint. When all of the other characters in the film were smoking blunts, Puffy was in the back making beats. When Biggie felt uninspired or encountered any kind of trouble, Puffy was the voice of reason; offering inspirational advice and encouragement. Puffy wanted to look as innocent as possible in this film. And he used his power as executive producer to make that happen. We all know he wasn't the saint he appeared to be in the movie. Who was he trying to fool?

I was a little disappointed in Angela Bassett's portrayal of Ms. Wallace as well. Bassett is a fantastic actress. This we all know. But she wasn't quite right for this role. The thing that bothered me the most was the way her Jamaican accent faded in and out throughout the entire film. One minute it was present, the next it was completely gone. The real Ms. Wallace has a very strong, prominent Jamaican accent. Bassett struggled to bring that accent to life. She didn't look or sound anything like the woman. And because of this, I didn't find her role the slightest bit believable.

There were also countless plot holes and unexplained storylines. How about some more information on Big's father. He left when Biggie was young. And that's really all we know and are told in the film. Who was Biggie's first baby's mother and how did they meet? We didn't see her at all until she popped up and said she was pregnant, which literally seemed to come out of the blue with zero explaination or development. Some more development into the Biggie/Faith relationship would've been nice too. The film wants us to believe that Lil Kim was Biggie's whore, while Faith was the woman he truly loved and wanted to settle with. And yet, the movie features more scenes and development between Biggie and Lil Kim than Biggie and Faith. I found that strange.

For a movie that was nearly over 2 hours long--it left too many unexplained questions. Instead they spent most of the film showing Biggie on stage rapping. Which was okay every now and then, but these scenes would last up to 3-4 minutes, which was completely unecessary.

There are some good attributes to the film, however. I was pleasantly surprised by Naturi Naughton's portrayal of Lil Kim. It was right on point; convincing and believable, especially during the scenes where she rapped Lil Kim's lyrics. She had the walk, talk, and essence of Lil Kim down to perfection.

Jamal Woolard's portrayal of Biggie was also a nice surprise. His voice was damn near identical to the rapper's. He also had his movement and mannerisms completely memorized, right down to the heavy breathing. I thought it was a good debut role for an unknown actor.

Overall, Notorious had its good points and bad points. Most of the casting was poor. The guy who played 2Pac was so unbelievable in the role it was almost comical. The direction and cinematography for the film was flashy and over-glossed. It didn't take the raw, gritty approach it should've. But at the same time, there were some real gems in this film. Jamal and Naturi's character portrayals were pleasant surprises. But even they couldn't save this movie from its numerous plot holes and unexplained storylines.