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On the Road With Duke Ellington
On the Road With Duke Ellington
Actors: Duke Ellington, Louis Armstrong, Mercer Ellington, Don Morrow, Johnny Hodges
Director: Robert Drew
Genres: Music Video & Concerts, Musicals & Performing Arts, Documentary
NR     2002     0hr 57min

Studio: New Video Group Release Date: 05/28/2002 Run time: 60 minutes Rating: Nr

     
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Movie Details

Actors: Duke Ellington, Louis Armstrong, Mercer Ellington, Don Morrow, Johnny Hodges
Director: Robert Drew
Creator: Anne Drew
Genres: Music Video & Concerts, Musicals & Performing Arts, Documentary
Sub-Genres: Pop, Ellington, Duke, Jazz, Documentary, Biography, Music & Performing Arts
Studio: Docurama
Format: DVD - Color,Full Screen
DVD Release Date: 05/28/2002
Original Release Date: 01/01/1967
Theatrical Release Date: 01/01/1967
Release Year: 2002
Run Time: 0hr 57min
Screens: Color,Full Screen
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaDVD Credits: 1
Total Copies: 0
Members Wishing: 0
MPAA Rating: NR (Not Rated)
Languages: English

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Movie Reviews

Welcome To Duke's World
Michael J. Connor | Waltham, MA USA | 07/07/2002
(4 out of 5 stars)

""One the Road With Duke Ellington" was first broadcast on October 13, 1967 on NBC. Filming began in earlier that year. Here's an idea of what is included in the film.
In April 1967 Ellington prepared his "Salute to Morgan State." He performed it on May 1, 1967. (Ellington received an Honorary Doctorate from the College.) He also performed "Take the A Train" and "Jones" which are included in the film.
On May 31, 1967 Billy Strayhorn died. Included in this documentary is footage of Ellington at Strayhorn's funeral.
On July 11, 1967 he and his band were in the RCA studios recording "Rondolet." This is included on the "Private Collection Volume 8"cd.
On July 26, 1967 he performed at the Gillmore Brothers Auto Park in Kalamazoo Michigan where (probably) "Traffic Jam" (aka "The Biggest and Busiest Intersection") and "In the Beginning God" were recorded.
Other interviews were filmed during the summer and early fall of 1967.
I don't know when Louis Armstrong showed up back stage to talk to Ellington, but it's very interesting. You see Ellington pull his cheek kissing bit (four kisses--one for each cheek) on Armstrong about two years before he pulled the same bit on Richard Nixon.
It should be said that the musical numbers are often abridged. No doubt that will anger some viewers, but it is fine by me. You can listen to Ellington's music any time. And this film really isn't about Ellington performing his music, it's about Ellington getting up in the morning, having his potato and steak breakfast, making calls, answering his mail, noodling at the piano, going on stage and performing, flirting with women (both young and old). For a 68 year old man, he's living just the way he wants to. He gets to write his music, record it, and perform it. Like I said--Welcome To Duke's World."