Search - Roots Rock Reggae - Inside the Jamaican Music Scene on DVD


Roots Rock Reggae - Inside the Jamaican Music Scene
Roots Rock Reggae - Inside the Jamaican Music Scene
Actors: Dennis Brown, Jimmy Cliff, Bob Marley, Jacob Miller, U-Roy
Genres: Music Video & Concerts, Educational, Documentary
NR     2000     1hr 0min

Roots, Rock, Reggae presents a street-level perspective on the reggae music scene during a very important period in the evolution of reggae music. In the late 1970s, police and thieves battled in the street, politicians st...  more »

     
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Movie Details

Actors: Dennis Brown, Jimmy Cliff, Bob Marley, Jacob Miller, U-Roy
Creator: Terence Dackombe
Genres: Music Video & Concerts, Educational, Documentary
Sub-Genres: Rock & Roll, Marley, Bob, Other Music, International, Educational, History
Studio: SHANACHIE
Format: DVD - Color
DVD Release Date: 02/22/2000
Original Release Date: 01/01/1977
Theatrical Release Date: 01/01/1977
Release Year: 2000
Run Time: 1hr 0min
Screens: Color
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaDVD Credits: 1
Total Copies: 0
Members Wishing: 2
MPAA Rating: NR (Not Rated)
Languages: English

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Movie Reviews

Top-rankin' documentary
Xam | nyc | 02/03/2004
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Anyone who is interested in roots reggae and dub will absolutely flip out over this documentary. Filmed in 1977, an incredibly important year in Jamaica, it covers the music/culture/politics of Jamaica (mostly music though). With unforgettable moments- like entering Lee "Scratch" Perry's BlackArk studio while the Heptones are recording. Then there's the late great Jacob Miller, in underwear, working out a song with the InnerCircle. The Gladiators recording, Mighty Diamonds live, and Joe Gibbs sings a beautiful trenchtown song. Get the idea? This is hugely important to anyone who loves this excellent music. The narration is also insightful and there are many scenes which capture tranchtown and the hard life of Jamaica.
This DVD is an absolute must-have for anyone who loves reggae. The picture and sound quality are totally fine, especially considering this was a small documentary that was probably made with very little money. I am sure that the DVD transfer was as good as it could be (and it's perfectly fine).
One side-note to reviewers that complain about the picture/sound- this was a small project in 1977, this is not Star Wars or Terminator. Don't have some ridiculous expectation that everything has to be up to the level of a big-budget hollywood blockbuster Ultimate edition DVD. It seems that reviewers all over Amazon like to complain too much about picture/sound quality. I personally own hundreds of DVDs and find that many complaints i've read are just flat-out wrong. I think people just feel the need to complain about something, but don't let them fool you."
Classic
v | 11/23/1999
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Jaw-Dropping Classic Film with Lee Perry at work at the Black Ark+! Reggae captured at it's greatest moment.Wow!"
A chance to see the real thing
john pazdan | chicago | 04/14/2002
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Are you a musician who needs some heavyweight inspiration? Do you love roots reggae? Ever wonder what the Black Ark/Randy's/ Randy's Record Store etc looked like from the inside in '77? It's all here, plus the Congos, a great Joe Gibbs acoustic song, Jacob Miller writing a tune with Inner Circle and a lot more."
Clarification
John W. Lawler | Paradise, CA United States | 05/07/2003
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Just to clarify something: in another review it is stated "at one point, it makes the erroneous claim that Rastafarianism was started by Marcus Garvey, which is not true". Well, it is true (sort of), although Marcus himself wasn't a rastifarian - a statement (prophesy) he made during a speech, that a "king (of kings) will rise out of Afrika, from the line of David" was what initially sparked the Rastifarian belief, which officially started when Haile Seliassie (a name that came with the crowning - his birth name was Ras Tafari, get it?), 225th in line from the house of David, was crowned as Emperor of Ethiopia. When Burning Spear sings "Macus Garvey words come to pass..." he is reffering to the prophesy..."