Search - Harlem Double Feature: Dirty Gertie From Harlem U.S.A. (1946) / Sepia Cinderella (1947) on DVD


Harlem Double Feature: Dirty Gertie From Harlem U.S.A. (1946) / Sepia Cinderella (1947)
Harlem Double Feature Dirty Gertie From Harlem USA / Sepia Cinderella
1946
Actors: Francine Everett, Don Wilson, Billy Daniels, Sheila Guyse
Genres: Drama
UR     2007     1hr 30min

A sexy, dancer from Harlem enlivens a sleepy Caribbean island resort / A beautiful but broken-hearted woman is the inspiration behind a huge hit. All black cast classic with a special appearance by Freddie Bartholomew.

     
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Movie Details

Actors: Francine Everett, Don Wilson, Billy Daniels, Sheila Guyse
Genres: Drama
Sub-Genres: Drama
Studio: Alpha Home Entertainment
Format: DVD - Black and White
DVD Release Date: 07/31/2007
Release Year: 2007
Run Time: 1hr 30min
Screens: Black and White
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaDVD Credits: 1
Total Copies: 0
Members Wishing: 1
MPAA Rating: Unrated
Languages: English

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Movie Reviews

Odd set, but interesting
Andre M. | Mt. Pleasant, SC United States | 10/20/2007
(3 out of 5 stars)

"This is an odd, but interesting entry into the "Harlem Double Feature" (early Black films from the 30s and 40s) series.

"Dirty Gertie" (directed by Spencer Williams, "Andy" of Amos & Andy who also appears in a cameo in drag as a fortuneteller) is about a wild stripper from Harlem who is on the run after two timing her boyfriend. She takes her show troupe to "Rinidad" to escape and floozies it up in grand style while down there, drawing the wrath of a local preacher. How does it end? You'll see. Pretty frank for its era, but typically poor production values that has to be overlooked to enjoy.

"Sepia Cinderella" deals with a crooner (Billy Daniels) who is seduced by an older woman who gets him ahead in showbiz. Once again, very frank for its era. The popular white actor Freddie Bartholomew makes an unusual cameo as he visits the crooner in the black nightclub. Derek Watson and his Brown Dots liven things up a bit (as they did in the abomination "Boy What a Girl"), but both films as a whole lack the high-powered vaudeville performances that are often the main redeeming features of this genre to modern audienes.

The latter is of historical interest as it is said that a very young Sidney Poitier made his debut in this film as an extra, but he is very hard to spot."
Black Jazz Meets Sepia Cinderella
Andrew Homzy | Montreal | 05/09/2008
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Certainly the most valuable aspect of this film is the unnecessary but wondrous appearance of the John Kirby Sextet. In their only known appearance on film, we see John Kirby on bass, Billy Kyle on piano, O'Neil Spencer on drums, Charlie Shavers on trumpet, Buster Bailey on clarinet, and Russell Procope on alto saxophone. Being in a film meant that these musicians gave something above and beyond what they did in their fine recordings made between 1938 and 1942. What a delight it is to see all these musicians playing with fire, joy and intensity - in total contrast to the slowness of the plot and the sad and dull theme song which the protagonist has composed (with the help of his lover)."