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The Jayne Mansfield Story
The Jayne Mansfield Story
Actors: Loni Anderson, Arnold Schwarzenegger
Director: Dick Lowry
Genres: Drama, Television
NR     1980     1hr 27min


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Movie Details

Actors: Loni Anderson, Arnold Schwarzenegger
Director: Dick Lowry
Genres: Drama, Television
Sub-Genres: Family Life, Television
Studio: Direct Source Label
Format: DVD - Color - Closed-captioned
DVD Release Date: 12/13/1980
Original Release Date: 01/01/1980
Theatrical Release Date: 01/01/1980
Release Year: 1980
Run Time: 1hr 27min
Screens: Color
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaDVD Credits: 1
Total Copies: 0
Members Wishing: 12
MPAA Rating: NR (Not Rated)
Languages: English, Spanish

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Movie Reviews

Lawyeraau | Balmoral Castle | 01/23/2005
(3 out of 5 stars)

"This film recounts the life of Jayne Mansfield and her transformation from a blooming Dallas high schooler to a platinum blonde bombshell who rose to prominence in the Hollywood of the 1950s. Starring Loni Anderson as Jayne and Arnold Schwartzenegger as her one time husband and true love, Mickey Hargitay, a former Mr. Universe and bodybuilder turned business man, the film is mildly entertaining. Her story unfolds through his eyes.

Hers is the sad story of an intelligent, beautiful women who initially chose to be viewed as a dumb blonde sex object in order to jump start her career as a film star, but who would later want to be given the opportunity to be considered as a serious actress. In her heyday in the 1950s, Ms. Mansfield was the toast of the town with fans up the wazoo.

Unfortunately, that was to be somewhat short-lived. Jayne Mansfield was never able to get over her stereotypic portrayal of a bimbo, so Hollywood never gave her serious consideration as an actress. In the battle of the dumb blondes, Ms. Mansfield ran a distant second to Marilyn Monroe. This relegation to the back of the pack would always stick in Ms. Mansfield's craw.

By the time the 1960s arrived, she, instead, courted cheap publicity, drank too much, and ended up a faded, buxom has been, as well as a divorcee with three children to whom she was a devoted mother. She was now a relic from a bygone time, as tastes changed with the advent of The Beatles and a new, exciting pop culture was emerging. With Marilyn Monroe already having met her maker, Ms. Mansfield's death from a tragic car accident, at thirty six, was to herald the end of an era.

Loni Anderson does an excellent job in the starring role, imbuing the role with enough intelligence, as well as pathos, to be compelling, though somewhat predictable . Surprisingly enough, Arnold Schwartzenegger does a credible job as Mickey Hargitay, painting a sympathetic portrait of Jayne's much beleaguered, one time husband and father to her two boys. Ray Butenika, as Ms. Mansfield's long time agent, Bob, gives a good performance. All in all, the film has an excellent cast that does its best with the somewhat mediocre script and is, at least, worth a rental.

I actually remember seeing Jayne Mansfield, when I was a young girl. In those days, theatres in Manhattan, such as the RKO, would often times showcase films in which the star of the film would make a guest appearance. The theatre would literally role out the red carpet and oftentimes a band, as well as a host of majorettes (of which I was one), twirling batons in unison, would greet the star as she stepped out of her limousine, larger than life. The star would also to be met by a throng of cheering fans outside the theatre. Then, she would be whisked away to the theatre, where she would go on stage and say a few words, only to disappear as quickly as she had arrived. This practice has now been consigned to the darkest recesses of the memories of those who participated in these theatrical welcome wagons.

Jayne We Hardly Knew You-The Jayne Mansfield Story
Perry R. Johnson | Atlanta, Ga. | 11/27/2005
(5 out of 5 stars)

"The Jayne Mansfield Story is probably the best movie Loni Anderson has ever made. Loni Anderson has never looked more beautiful than she did when she first appeared as Jayne. Arnold Schwarchenegger does a great job as Mickey Hargitay but doesn't look anything like the real one. The movie is really colorful. I am sure if you were to find any of the costumes Loni wore as Jayne in the movie that it would cost a small fortune. Now, the setbacks.

The movie portrays Jayne Mansfield as a sad woman whose only desire is to be a serious actress who stays a star. There are many lines where Jayne is always comparing herself to Marilyn Monroe. Jayne Mansfield actually had high self-esteem. I am sure she was not happy about her movie career after "Kiss Them For Me" but she never felt sorry for herself. Research into the movie was not extensive. The movie states Jayne Mansfield died at the age of 36. Jayne Mansfield died at the age of 34. Also, the other children are hardly seen or mentioned at all. In fact, I don't think they ever showed Mariska Hargitay as a little girl at all. One scene incorrectly shows Jayne making the movie "Las Vegas Hillbillies" as a western. It wasn't. One line in the movie was done in horrible bad taste. In the beginning, when Jayne is trying to break into movies, she tells her agent that she will work her head off. At the time, there were many rumors that Jayne Mansfield was decapitated in her fatal car accident. She was not but people believed it at the time. It would have been nice to have had a scene where Jayne was worried about her son Zoltan being mauled by a lion. It would have shown the compassionate side to Jayne.

All and all, it is still a great movie and the only movie about Jayne Mansfield. My favorite campy line is "Carol Sue, where's the vodka?" Buy the movie, you will watch it more than once.

P.S. I wish they would do another Jayne Mansfield movie. If Jessica Simpson could improve her acting, she would be a great choice for Jayne. She has the same vitality and sexiness which made Jayne a star."
Loni Anderson good actress but the movie C - ratings
Perry R. Johnson | 05/18/2002
(2 out of 5 stars)

"The Jayne Mansfield Story, from the early 1980's, was a bold attempt to recreate an icon. Jayne's life was a press agent's "dream come true" and she allowed thousands of adoring fans to be near her, to catch a glimpse and photograph the Bombshell. But underneath all the exterior image, Jayne was a
blooming actress begging to grow beyond certain standards made by the Studio Executives in which she worked for. Marilyn Monroe was never disrespectful to her competitor but, Jayne never could brush off the comparisons that eventually trapped her
career. Her surviving family for years recall her devotion to her children first and actress second. Jayne struggled along the way and never gave up on working hard for her goals. It all came to a terrible car accident that gave her no chance of survival.
To showcase the memory of Jayne Mansfield, this film personified
that era and made actress Loni Anderson a "house hold name.
The costumes were obvioulsy chosen to recreate the Blonde Bombshell's incredible image but, the story line was more fabricated and somewhat silly . TO see everyone around Loni Anderson's portrayl such as supporting actors in the film didn't fit the picture. For Loni to be in character at all times during the film it was funny to witness people with 1980 hair styles .Leaving Loni the only actress dedicated to making the picture work and she looked suprisingly like Jayne's fantasy twin. I couldn't imagine someone else portraying Jayne than Loni Anderson. It's obvious that if certain entries were left out it was for reasons concerning her family and friends privacy. The film is fun to watch the comparisons but the story is weak and over dramatic. I would recommend any fan to purchase or rent the A & E Biography's tribute to Jayne because it really takes flight with her historical background and lots of loved ones express their joy and sorrow for the faded star."