Search - I Love You, Man on DVD


I Love You, Man
I Love You Man
Actors: Paul Rudd, Jason Segel
Genres: Comedy
R     2009     1hr 45min

In this wildly funny hit comedy, Paul Rudd (Knocked Up) gets engaged to the girl of his dreams but has not a single guy friend to be his Best Man until he meets the ultimate dude, Jason Segal (Forgetting Sarah Marshall). R...  more »

     

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Movie Details

Actors: Paul Rudd, Jason Segel
Genres: Comedy
Sub-Genres: Romantic Comedies
Studio: PARAMOUNT HOME VIDEO
Format: DVD - Color,Widescreen - Dubbed,Subtitled
DVD Release Date: 08/11/2009
Original Release Date: 01/01/2009
Theatrical Release Date: 03/20/2009
Release Year: 2009
Run Time: 1hr 45min
Screens: Color,Widescreen
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaDVD Credits: 1
Total Copies: 0
Members Wishing: 0
MPAA Rating: R (Restricted)
Languages: English, Spanish
Subtitles: English, French, Spanish
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Member Movie Reviews

Brian M. from NAPLES, FL
Reviewed on 12/29/2013...
i like this movie, it is one of my favorites
Kathleen P. from OAKLAND, CA
Reviewed on 12/13/2013...
I love bromances. Sweet movie.
1 of 1 member(s) found this review helpful.
Brad S. (Snibot) from DALLAS, TX
Reviewed on 11/26/2012...
I try not to write reviews unless I can add something to the mix. What I can add is this:

Ladies, this is a great date night movie. There were parts of this movie where I had a hard time breathing I was laughing so hard. It wasn't a nonstop laugh fest but it was really good and really cool.

It has Lou Ferrigno - the Original Hulk ... Pretty much every man loves The Hulk.

It isn't like The Hangover, it has much more traditional comedy, which is nice. It has great timing, excellent writing, and the actors really give great performances. Some of the things you can see a mile away, but that doesn't change how cool it is.

This is a great renter at Red Box or a swap, I can see myself watching it a few more times.
1 of 2 member(s) found this review helpful.
Lewis P. (Turfseer) from NEW YORK, NY
Reviewed on 12/19/2010...
Quirky 'bromance' vacillates between moments of mirth and outright crudity

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

'I love you, man' reminds me of Seinfeld: it's much more farce than comedy. Like Seinfeld, the protagonists are likable but offbeat and quirky and the antagonists who oppose them are far more neurotic (proverbial 'damaged goods') than the protagonists. It should be noted that one of the co-writers is Larry Levin, who wrote for 'Seinfeld' back in the 90s.

Peter Klaven (played by the amiable Paul Rudd) is a real estate broker in Southern California who's about to get married to Zooey (Rashida Jones). Peter feels embarrassed by the fact that he has no close male friends and is determined to find a best man for his wedding. It's made clear at a family gathering that Peter always felt more comfortable around women in contrast to brother Robbie who of course has no trouble meeting men and his father Oswald, who boasts about having a lifetime male best friend.

Peter then goes out on a series of unsuccessful 'man-dates' where he meets one loser after another. One of those dates is Robbie's crazy personal trainer colleague who has a funny bit 'losing it' at an LA Galaxy soccer game. There's also another weird guy Peter's mother fixes him up with; it turns out he's gay and ends up kissing Peter outside the restaurant they went to for dinner. This character pops up later and he's amusing as a frustrated stalker.

Less successful is the gruff Barry, husband of Zooey's good friend, Denise. Peter is reluctantly invited over for some male bonding at a poker game and ends up throwing up all over Barry after a night of drinking. I didn't really see the humor in the Barry character, as he is supposed to be some humorless macho guy who is continually reminding Peter that he doesn't fit into the world of male camaraderie. Finally there's Tevin, Peter's fellow real estate associate, who obnoxiously keeps asking Peter whether he'll consider going partners on selling an expensive house which Peter has been rep-ping for real-life actor Lou Ferrigno (TV's 'Hulk'). Tevin is not a very funny or endearing character especially when he suggests that Peter promote himself by putting his image on urinal cakes in well-known, local restaurants.

It takes about 25 minutes into the film when Peter finally meets his 'bro', Sydney Fife, at an open house which Peter has organized in an attempt to sell Lou Ferrigno's house. Sydney reveals to Peter that the only reason he shows up at these open houses is for the food and to possibly pick up available divorcées. Peter is drawn to the aggressive, single Sydney after he proves to be quite intuitive in discerning the true motives of some of Peter's prospective buyers. In a bizarre bit, Sydney observes how one prospective client sends his date to look at another room in the house as he doesn't want her around when he farts. Even when we learn that Sydney refuses to clean up after his dog defecates on a Venice boardwalk, Peter is more fascinated than repulsed by the extremely eccentric Sydney. Sydney's belief that dog doody is good for the environment is a turn-off but it IS funny when he morphs into a lunatic and begins screaming at the guy who tries to call him on his refusal to clean up, after his dog relieves himself.

Peter proves to be just as quirky as Sydney but in a much more good-natured way. One of Peter's perennial tics is his blurting out of things he doesn't mean to say as well as assigning nicknames to Sydney which make no sense. For awhile, Sydney's single life proves attractive to Peter. They bond at Sydney's cluttered bachelor pad even though Sydney reveals he has a small 'station' in his house reserved for masturbation. Peter also has no objection to Sydney's firm conviction that no discussions about their sex lives are off-limits. The only 'normal' thing that the odd couple seem to share is a love for the rock band 'Rush'. After revealing that he used to play bass in high school, Peter accompanies Sydney (who plays guitar), as they jam to Rush songs at the bachelor pad.

Eventually, Sydney's confrontational style gets Peter into hot water at his engagement party. Cryptically, Sydney reveals that Peter is somewhat unhappy with Zooey as she doesn't appear to enjoy oral sex. Peter escapes Zooey's condemnation during the car ride home, when he calls her on her earlier revelations of their sex life to her friends.

Peter and Sydney's relationship reaches its apotheosis when Peter lends his buddy $8,000. But he also plants doubts in Peter's mind as to why he's involved with Zooey at all. When Peter foolishly expresses the same doubts to Zooey directly, she leaves him to stay with her girlfriends. Peter has had enough, dumps Sydney and makes up with Zooey. Meanwhile, Sydney uses the $8,000 to buy billboard space, promoting Peter as a hot shot realtor. All's well that end's well when Sydney's efforts lead to a great amount of new business for Peter while Zooey ends up calling Sydney at the last minute to attend their wedding as Peter's best man.

'I love you, man' loses its comic edge when Peter and Sydney get real serious and break up. The sentimental ending could have been much improved, had the film's scenarists decided to have Peter's life unravel more intensely than merely depicting the short breakup between him and Zooey. One alternative could have been to have Peter lose his job and then being saved after Sydney's billboard plan is brought to fruition.

In the end, I wondered why some of the film's foul language couldn't have been toned down a bit. What's more, jokes such as likening Anwar Sadat to a dog can be interpreted as a true insult in the Muslim World. While not a laugh out loud farce, 'Man' has its moments of mirth.
2 of 5 member(s) found this review helpful.

Movie Reviews

The Rebirth Of Platonic Love Between Men!
Happy Camper | Baltimore, Maryland USA | 03/31/2009
(5 out of 5 stars)

"The United States, in general, is quite a homophobic country. Men are expected to have platonic feelings of love only for immediate family members, such as parents, grandparents, siblings and their own offspring. Sharing one's nonsexual feelings of love outside this tiny world is basically considered taboo. In other cultures this is certainly not the case, something I had the good fortune to experience first hand!

I Love You, Man does a superb job of comparing and contrasting heterosexual women's emotionally rich, same-sex friendships with heterosexual men's typically barren, same-sex friendships. It exposes the hypocrisy that it's okay for women to hug and be emotionally close and talk in graphic details about their sex lives amongst themselves, but NOT for a man to do the same exact thing!

What a refreshing and insightful film! This brilliant story also compares male homosexual and heterosexual same-sex relationships and on the surface, at least, they are indistinguishable! This might be news to some people - but all well-adjusted human beings have a yearning for emotionally rewarding relationships!

And, one person can not fulfill ALL your emotional needs! It's really that simple!

Thank you Hollywood for taking such a risk in making such a profound film with a great sense of humor! It shows you believe a certain segment of the American public is mature enough to want to explore the meaning of platonic love between men!

Platonic Studies"
The Comical Fate of the Sensitive Male
Ed Uyeshima | San Francisco, CA USA | 03/30/2009
(4 out of 5 stars)

"At the core of what looks on the surface to be a standard summer buddy movie is an intriguing premise: What does become of the overly sensitized male when confronted with the reality that all his closest friends are female and that he is at a complete loss to find any groomsmen, in particular, a best man, for his wedding? It's not an earth-shattering dilemma to address, yet the situation gives rise to a lot of amusing questions about what constitutes masculine behavior in our supposedly evolved society. Fortunately, director/co-writer John Hamburg (Along Came Polly) has fashioned a 2009 comedy (with co-writer Larry Levin) full of shrewd observations and hilarious gags that transcend formula and elevate the story into something fresh and genuinely likeable.

When sweet-natured L.A. real estate broker Peter Klaven decides to marry Zooey, his girlfriend of eight months, it dawns on both of them that he has no close male friends. Whispers about his manhood and her fear of him being too clingy as a husband lead Peter to set up a series of disastrous man-dates, one being the predictable mistaken gay date. However, it's at an open house at Lou Ferrigno's manse that he meets his personality opposite - Sydney Fife, a slovenly, blunt albeit socially observant slacker. As it turns out, their differences complement one another in a way that makes them best buddies almost from the get-go - that and a common obsession for the 1970's power band Rush. Naturally, Zooey starts to resent Sydney's burgeoning role in Peter's life - and things get complicated before the inevitable conclusion.

Two of Judd Apatow's familiar rep company star. Finally at the center of a major movie, Paul Rudd is ideally cast as Peter since the role takes advantage of how he combines his boyish charm and unpredictable nebbishness into a memorable character. In fact, he manages to give Peter's awkward attempts to overcome his social anxiety a certain emotional resonance. We feel every painful step he takes in replicating Sydney's free spirit, and it becomes easy to root for his success. Much better cast here than as the self-conscious lead in last year's Forgetting Sarah Marshall, Jason Segel offers his doughy likeability to a role that suits his casual, lumbering personality, even when he exposes an intimate secret between Peter and Zooey in a wedding party dinner toast.

If the interplay between Rudd and Segel feels familiar from Apatow comedies like The 40-Year-Old Virgin and Knocked Up, it is a coincidence that Hamburg takes full advantage of to keep the movie comically involving. Rashida Jones brings a raspy appeal to Zooey, although she is kept mostly at the sidelines. Also underused are Jaime Pressly as Zooey's tart-tongued friend Denise and as Peter's parents, J.K. Simmons (playing the same wiseass father he played in Juno) and especially Jane Curtin. Jon Favreau has a thankless role as Denise's alpha-male jerk of a husband, while Andy Samberg makes a most unconvincing gay as Peter's sleep-around, personal trainer brother. There are plenty of laughs throughout its slightly long 105-minute running time, but what may surprise you is the number of insightful moments that this affectionate, satirical comedy provides."
The most bro-mantic movie ever...
Andrew Ellington | I'm kind of everywhere | 10/02/2009
(5 out of 5 stars)

"When `I Love You, Man' first came out I rushed to the theater with my then best friend to see it. We had the type of relationship that was very rare I think; a bond that was unlike any I had with anyone else and, to be honest, one I never want to have again (the closer you are the harder they hurt you). Anyways, I'm not trying to be a downer, and I know that no one wants to hear this, but the reason I bring it up is this; when I left the theater that day I really, really loved this movie. I was ready to give it a five-star blazing review. Now that my then best friend and I are no longer speaking to one another I began to wonder if my adoration of this film was blinded love based on a personal connection I had with the subject matter.

It wasn't.

So that is why I mention my god-awful story of betrayed friendship, because in the end `I Love You, Man' still holds up, regardless of you current situation. It is genuine, charming, authentic, original and very, very funny.

The film tells of Peter Klaven; the `girlfriend guy'. He never really had steady friendships because he's not like most men. He's sweet and sensitive and emotional and caring and so he has a great track record with women, but when it comes down to selecting his bridal party (a guy that perfect can never stay single for long) he realizes that he has no friends. So, he embarks on a quest to find a best man, and that is when he runs into Sydney Fife; the complete opposite of Peter. He is crude and abrasive and a total womanizer and comfortable bachelor, but he possesses the same genuineness that Peter has. Each man compliments the other, helping them edge out their own personalities and become more complete individuals.

Why is writing this review making me so depressed?

Anyways, the film is littered with very funny scenes and a lot of well placed humor, but the heart of this film takes a tenderer and even more serious tone of true friendship and that act of finding oneself for the first time. The acting is very good all across the board, especially for this type of feature, but no one does as good a job at really reaching the audience as Paul Rudd. Rudd is flawless here, really grabbing hold of the awkwardness of making friends, of being yourself while constantly trying to impress another person. I know exactly what it's like to call up someone you don't really know but want to get to know (on a friendly level) and find yourself stammering through the most painfully awkward voice mail you've ever left.

I'm telling you; he really is OSCAR worthy here, and that is not something you say very often about performances in this genre of film.

Everything in this film feels so genuine because it is all so believable. I remember looking at my then best friend throughout the film smiling and nudging him, saying "this is so us" and it was; yet sadly it wasn't.

Friendship, and by that I mean TRUE FRIENDSHIP is a rarity today, and I'm thankful that someone finally broke the male bonding stereotype by making a film that is a true testament to the need for real friendship. This is a very smart film that mixes the funny with the heart without ever overdoing it and without ever straying from its objective. With a slew of nicely placed supporting performances (and a scene stealer by Andy Samberg), `I Love You, Man' is the complete package that will make you laugh and smile and, if you're me, cry."