Search - Roustabout on DVD

Actors: Elvis Presley, Barbara Stanwyck, Joan Freeman, Leif Erickson, Sue Ane Langdon
Director: John Rich
Genres: Classics, Comedy, Drama, Music Video & Concerts, Musicals & Performing Arts
PG     2000     1hr 41min

Elvis plays a down-and-out singer who finds a home with a carnival owned by Stanwyck. Many of his hit songs are included. Genre: Musicals Rating: PG Release Date: 14-AUG-2007 Media Type: DVD


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Movie Details

Actors: Elvis Presley, Barbara Stanwyck, Joan Freeman, Leif Erickson, Sue Ane Langdon
Director: John Rich
Creators: Lucien Ballard, Hal B. Wallis, Joseph H. Hazen, Paul Nathan, Allan Weiss, Anthony Lawrence
Genres: Classics, Comedy, Drama, Music Video & Concerts, Musicals & Performing Arts
Sub-Genres: Classics, Comedy, Love & Romance, Presley, Elvis, Classic Rock, Musicals
Studio: Paramount
Format: DVD - Color,Widescreen - Closed-captioned
DVD Release Date: 05/02/2000
Original Release Date: 11/11/1964
Theatrical Release Date: 11/11/1964
Release Year: 2000
Run Time: 1hr 41min
Screens: Color,Widescreen
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaDVD Credits: 1
Total Copies: 0
Members Wishing: 10
MPAA Rating: PG (Parental Guidance Suggested)
Languages: English
Subtitles: English

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Movie Reviews

A Lot of fun with Elvis and Stanwyck!
Sean Orlosky | Yorktown, IN United States | 05/19/2000
(5 out of 5 stars)

"In one of his best movies, Elvis Presley plays a handsome, bonafide jerk who, on route to his next job, accidentally encounters Barbara Stanwyck, her even jerkier husband, and her beautiful step-daughter (Joan Freeman). Maggie (Stanwyck) decides to let Elvis become her dying carnival's roustabout, but he does more. When Elvis sings, well, you know what happens! The carnival begins to attract attention and the money starts rolling in. But when Elvis is offered a bigger salary by another carnie, he is torn between the prospects of a better life and his loyalty to Stanwyck, and particularly, her step-daughter. Every song in the film is "a wonderful, wonderful, wonderful, wonderful" experience. Elvis's fun rockin' with "Poision Ivy League" to his romantic wooing of Freeman in a ferris wheel, to the upbeat "It's Carnival Time" the big production number, "Little Egypt", and the final, memorable number, "And The Whole World's Gonna Be Mine". And Stanwyck is just great as the good-hearted carnie whom Elvis learns to trust. You'll have fun with this movie or buy it for the Elvis fan in your family... "be a big shot for a dollar, it's Carnival Time!""
Can you believe it? A leather-clad drifting biker!
Josh P. | 11/09/2002
(5 out of 5 stars)

""Roustabout" has Elvis playing a karate-chopping, drifting motorcyclist who is picked up after an accident involving him being knocked off his bike by local carnival foreman Leif Erikson, with his daughter Joan Freeman and owner Barbara Stanwyck. After his bike and guitar are damaged, he is hired by Stanwyck to work as a roustabout in her carnival. Elvis, of course, soon falls for Joan Freeman who is a little reluctant at first. Over time the carnival becomes the local night spot around as Elvis attracts people for singing along the midway. In come the teenagers and crowds in droves. Rival carnivla owner Pat Buttram asks if Elvis is interested in joining his big carnival. He refuses. After some confrontation involving a stolen wallet Erikson is convicted of and Joan Freeman's unhappiness with Elvis, he quits Stanwyck's outfit. Then it's off to the Carver show. Elvis is a hit. Back at the other carnival, business is failing and troubles with the bank build. Joan Freeman tries to bring him back, but to no avail at first. Later Elvis decides to go back, pay off the debt, win Joan Freeman, and make the carnival a swinging place again. Quintessential!"
One of John Rich's Best Films
Kevin Killian | San Francisco, CA United States | 11/15/2004
(5 out of 5 stars)

"John Rich later became a TV titan and directed many of the best episodes of the best TV series, as well as taking a hand at production. But his feature film career is even more interesting. Like many journeyman directors, he was assigned a brace of Elvis pictures--this one and the later, hippie-themed EASY COME, EASY GO. But he was also responsible for some of the most under-rated programmers of the 1960s, including THE NEW INTERNS and BOEING BOEING--and WIVES AND LOVERS as well. In ROUSTABOUT he demonstrates a flair for working with actors of all stripes, from the legendary Golden Age star represented here by Barbara Stanwyck, to the neophyte starlet--in ROUSTABOUT there are plenty of them, and the most sparkling is a very young Raquel Welch, who makes her film debut in the opening scene as a college coed mesmerized by Elvis' singing. Raquel looks great and seems quite believable. It's no wonder her fi;lm career soared after making this film. As Elvis' leading lady, Joan Freeman is pretty good, and for this we can thank John Rich, he brings out colors in her otherwise cut and paste performance that we would not see again in Ms. Freeman's acting until her amusing later turn as "Ellie Jackson" in the Don Knotts goof-fest THE RELUCTANT ASTRONAUT.

As for Barbara Stanwyck, what can you say? She's great in the part and, even though at the time people say she was slumming by taking a supporting role in an Elvis picture, in hindsight she was pretty wise, for she was able to keep her name above the title and in Hollywood, that's all that matters. She was one star who was able to keep working until the day she died. As Maggie in ROUSTABOUT she adds new luster to the word, "Termagant." She's bitter, she's fiery, she's curt, she's passionate and she's salty. She's seen it all and laid down the law to bigger men than Elvis. And yet at the end of the day, when all is said and done, she needs him to maintain her autonomy over her grand little carnival. The two of them strike sparks together and their scenes have some of the resonance, at any rate, that Elvis brought to scenes with older women who reminded him of Gladys, his own late mother whom he adored."
Poison Ivy League.
Robert S. Clay Jr. | St. Louis, MO., USA | 01/08/2002
(3 out of 5 stars)

"This Elvis flick leans to the dramatic. Not great drama, mind you, but more serious than the usual EP Grade B frolic. By 1964, Elvis was getting too old to be convincing as an "angry young man," but he gave it his best shot. Elvis is the motorbike-riding rebel whose singing peps up business at a struggling carnival. Elvis clashes with the hard-drinking ramrod, Joe (Leif Erickson). Joan Freeman and Elvis moon around each other, but find romance a rocky road. Movie veteran Barbara Stanwyck lends stature to the film as the carnival owner. The song writing teams of Giant-Baum-Kaye and Leiber-Stoller wrote some of the music, but the results are only mixed. On the plus side, the ballad "Big Love, Big Heartache" and the comic "Little Egypt" number are worth the effort of viewing. The other music is less memorable. One amusing footnote is Pat Buttram as a rival carnival owner. This was shortly before he enjoyed popular recogniton as Mr. Haney on TV's "Green Acres." Given the movie's emphasis on the social mores of carnival folks, we wonder if Col. Tom Parker was in hog heaven, considering his carny background. The movie offers good Hal Wallis production values. Wallis once asserted he made flicks like this one to raise money for serious films like "Becket." He considered Elvis trivial but profitable. Elvis fans will be pleased with this movie, regardless. Sample the cotton candy fluff. ;-)"