Search - Driving Miss Daisy on DVD


Driving Miss Daisy
Driving Miss Daisy
Actors: Morgan Freeman, Jessica Tandy, Dan Aykroyd, Patti LuPone, Esther Rolle
Director: Bruce Beresford
Genres: Comedy, Drama, Kids & Family
PG     1997     1hr 39min

Winner of the Academy AwardŽ for best picture of 1989, this gracefully moving drama, adapted from the hit play by Alfred Uhry, chronicles the 25-year friendship between a stubborn, aging Southern widow (Jessica Tandy) and ...  more »

     

Larger Image

Movie Details

Actors: Morgan Freeman, Jessica Tandy, Dan Aykroyd, Patti LuPone, Esther Rolle
Director: Bruce Beresford
Creators: Alfred Uhry, David Brown, Jake Eberts, Lili Fini Zanuck, Richard D. Zanuck, Robert Doudell
Genres: Comedy, Drama, Kids & Family
Sub-Genres: Dan Aykroyd, Drama, 10-12 Years
Studio: Warner Home Video
Format: DVD - Color,Full Screen - Closed-captioned
DVD Release Date: 04/30/1997
Original Release Date: 01/26/1990
Theatrical Release Date: 01/26/1990
Release Year: 1997
Run Time: 1hr 39min
Screens: Color,Full Screen
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaDVD Credits: 1
Total Copies: 0
Members Wishing: 25
MPAA Rating: PG (Parental Guidance Suggested)
Languages: English, French
Subtitles: English, Spanish, French
See Also:

Similar Movies

Fried Green Tomatoes
Extended Anniversary Edition
   PG-13   2006   2hr 10min
Steel Magnolias
Special Edition
Director: Herbert Ross
   PG   2000   1hr 57min
Guarding Tess
Director: Hugh Wilson
   PG-13   1998   1hr 36min
Places in the Heart
   PG   2001   1hr 51min
On Golden Pond
Director: Mark Rydell
   PG   1998   1hr 49min

Similarly Requested DVDs

The Bounty Hunter
Director: Andy Tennant
   PG-13   2010   1hr 50min
   
Saving Private Ryan
Special Limited Edition
Director: Steven Spielberg
   R   1999   2hr 49min
   
The Office - Season Two
   UR   2006   7hr 57min
   
The Duchess
Director: Saul Dibb
   PG-13   2008   1hr 50min
   
Finding Forrester
Director: Gus Van Sant
   PG-13   2001   2hr 16min
   
Secondhand Lions
New Line Platinum Series
Director: Tim McCanlies
   PG   2004   1hr 49min
   
It Could Happen to You
Director: Andrew Bergman
   PG   1998   1hr 41min
   
Charlie Wilson's War
Widescreen
   R   2008   1hr 42min
   
Kate Leopold
Director: James Mangold
   PG-13   2002   1hr 58min
   
Gosford Park
Director: Robert Altman
   R   2002   2hr 17min
   
 

Member Movie Reviews

Linda D. from SAN JOSE, CA
Reviewed on 12/6/2015...
OK movie but on the slow side. Good reminder that we all deserve respect to and from each other. It doesn't matter who you are, we all get dressed one leg at a time!
1 of 1 member(s) found this review helpful.
Kenneth L. from ROCK PORT, MO
Reviewed on 10/28/2010...
While uncomfortable with the background of prejudice against which the story is played out, I felt it was handled as well as attitudes of the time allowed and I appreciated the evolution of respect the movie portrayed.
Aimee M. (AimeeM)
Reviewed on 2/26/2008...
This movie is a very sweet, heartwarming movie. It just doesn't have a lot of plot or action.

The theme is obviously: overcoming racial barriers. So the characters are diverse. The actors are top of the line, with Jessica Tandy playing the perfect Miss Daisy.

This movie is not meant to entertain you by a fast plot. But it has plenty of humor, and even some tear jerker parts.

Worth Watching several times.
3 of 3 member(s) found this review helpful.

Movie Reviews

The best of the best
Peggy Vincent | Oakland, CA | 12/24/2003
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Superb casting of Jessica Tandy as a stubborn elderly Southern woman of privilege and Morgan Freeman as her loyal and capable and patient chauffeur makes this one of the best dramas and character studies of all time. Tandy won an Oscar for this 1989 performance and Freeman was nominated for one. This is a movie of wonderful spirited characters, people who demonstrate sassiness, independence, tolerance, admiration, and respect for each other - but only after a few years of working together. It all started when Miss Daisy crashed her car and her son, Dan Aykroyd, a pompous banker type, declared she absolutely could drive no more. So he hired a chauffeur for her. At first, all the old Southern prejudices came into plan, prejudices of class, race, and education. But gradually the wisdom and quiet patience of Freeman's character won her over.
At its core, this is the story of an unlikely friendship that shows it's possible to transcend prejudice and appreciate the human being within.Highest marks."
This Widescreen shows less picture than Fullscreen!
Chad L. Alvord | UT United States | 09/25/2004
(1 out of 5 stars)

"Driving Miss Daisy is one of my all-time favorites. I bought the Special Edition widescreen DVD (ISBN 0-7907-7237-X, UPC 0-85392-33402-5) and was horribly disappointed. It shows less picture than does my old fullscreen VHS tape (and I seem to be the only one who has noticed)! Although the image is with a widescreen aspect ratio, the left & right sides of the picture do not extend beyond those of the VHS. And the top & bottom letterbox black bars on the DVD image are actually covering up parts of the picture that I can see on the VHS. In other words, THE PICTURE BETWEEN WIDESCREEN DVD AND FULLSCREEN VHS IS IDENTICAL, EXCEPT THAT THE DVD HAS BLACK BARS LITERALLY COVERING UP THE TOP & BOTTOM. For instance, at the end of the movie, the VHS tape clearly shows Miss Daisy's hand fumbling with the fork, and her slice of pie sitting there on the table. On the widescreen DVD, this is all covered up by the bottom black bar, so all you see of the pie is the few bites that Hoke raises (out of the void) to Miss Daisy's mouth. The touching scene is completely ruined. I'm not exactly sure what's up with this pseudo-widescreen version, but it stinks."
Old Friends.
F. Gentile | Lake Worth, Florida, United States | 07/16/2004
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Lovely is such an old fashioned word, I know. But that's the word that describes this film, for me. The story of the developing friendship over many years between the black chaueffeur and the older Jewish woman is very heartwarming in its simplicity. Jessica Tandy is marvelous as "Miss Daisy" the fiercely independant, irascible widow, whose advancing age requires her son to employ, against her wishes, a driver/companion for her. Miss Tandy, who originated the role of Blanche DuBois on Broadway in "A Streetcar Named Desire", was a wonderful actress. This was one of her last films, and all the skill, sublety, and experience of her life-long craft come together to create a living, breathing "Miss Daisy." Morgan Freeman meets her skill in his portrayal of "Hoag", the accomodating chaueffeur. He has the manner of a certain resignation that an older black man may have felt in the turbulent, prejudiced south in which he lived, yet exudes dignity. He has the manner of "Hoag" down pat, right down to the closed mouth laugh that I have seen in the old black men who hang out on the corner. This is not a caricature, he IS "Hoag." His relationship with Miss Daisy starts out very rocky, to say the least, but, as time passes, their places in each others lives develope into almost a "marriage", with a quiet understanding of, and dependence on, each other. And though Miss Daisy insists she was not prejudiced, and inherently wasn't, it is touching to see her slowly let go of her last universally accepted beliefs of peoples place in society, where the "colored" help were always servants of some sort, and the line was just never crossed. Scenes such as the one where she and "Hoag" are both eating their dinner in the house, she in the dining room, he , alone in the kitchen, express this. The very thought of them dining together, it just wasn't done. As time goes on, and she becomes quietly aware of the similarities of the prejudices against her religion and the prejudices and injustice against Hoags race, the differences that seperate them become insignicant. Dan Akroyd and Patti Lupone are fine as Miss Daisy's son and his typically '50s wife, who admonishes her black maid for the unforgivable sin of forgetting to tell her she was out of coconut for the ambrosia she was serving to her guests... a '50s hostess' nightmare. There are a few moments when their performances threaten to lapse into parody, but one is only aware of this because this is basically a two person play, and the skill and realism of Tandys and Freemans performances just eclipse the others, they are basically props compared to the skill and, yes, sublety of the leads . The exception is Esther Rolle as "Idella" , Miss Daisys black maid. Though her part is small, and her lines few, she manages to convey a resigned dignity also, and her dead-pan delivery of several one liners is very humorous. Miss Daisys affection and respect for Idella is clearly etched upon her face, however, at Idella's funeral. This is just a wonderfully simple, beautiful film. It never treads into being overly sentimental, thanks to the casting of two very special stars. This film took many by surprise by winning the Oscar for best film of the year, proving that a movie with no special effects, and, that actually tells a story, can still move audiences. The final scene, where their years-long friendship comes full circle, will have tears in your eyes, as Miss Daisy conveys the sweet sad wisdom of the old, who know that "all shall soon pass....""