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The Man Who Knew Too Much
The Man Who Knew Too Much
Actors: Leslie Banks, Edna Best, Peter Lorre, Frank Vosper, Hugh Wakefield
Genres: Action & Adventure, Indie & Art House, Mystery & Suspense
UR     1999     1hr 15min

A Frenchman who befriends a vacationing family is shot through the heart during a dance with the young mother. Before dying, he whispers a secret... This story so appealed to Hitchcock that he remade it 21 years later. I...  more »
     
     

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Movie Details

Actors: Leslie Banks, Edna Best, Peter Lorre, Frank Vosper, Hugh Wakefield
Genres: Action & Adventure, Indie & Art House, Mystery & Suspense
Sub-Genres: Classics, Indie & Art House, Mystery & Suspense
Studio: Delta
Format: DVD - Black and White
DVD Release Date: 07/24/1999
Original Release Date: 03/22/1935
Theatrical Release Date: 03/22/1935
Release Year: 1999
Run Time: 1hr 15min
Screens: Black and White
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaDVD Credits: 1
Total Copies: 32
Members Wishing: 0
Edition: Special Edition
MPAA Rating: Unrated
Languages: English
Subtitles: Spanish, Japanese, Chinese

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Member Movie Reviews

Wayne F. (WWIIpfc) from COLORADO SPGS, CO
Reviewed on 10/1/2011...
If you like Alfred Hitchcock you'll like this one.

Movie Reviews

Hitchcock's First Five-Star Entry
Interplanetary Funksmanship | Vanilla Suburbs, USA | 11/26/2007
(5 out of 5 stars)

"I agree with Alfred Hitchcock in his assessment that his 1956 remake of this 1934 classic was a superior movie. However, that's only when pressed. Really, despite mostly having the same story line and climactic scene at the Royal Albert Hall, they are two different films.

It's not just because one is in black and white, whereas the other is in color, or that one features British and the other American leads. It's more intangible than that. It has to do with pacing, and that this is a more tongue-in-cheek thriller than the remake. Also, while Hitch never stopped pushing the envelope on visual effects, it's so interesting watching this one, because he was learning as he made it. When Edna Best faints upon learning that her daughter (Nova Pilbeam) has been kidnapped, the camera movement simulates the room spinning round and round. It's a sort of primitive shot, one that Hitch didn't smoothly master until the 1940s. That said, it cannot be denied that Hitchcock's primary visual contribution at this point was in applying the German Expressionist montage sensibility to the British cinema, which was theretofore fledgling.

The acting is all right from the good guys, but it's the villains who are most impressive in this version. Peter Lorre as Abbott is creepy, and quite a polished actor, whereas the British actors were a little awkward in reciting their lines. Lorre was smooth, confident, volatile and simply a pleasure to watch. Cicily Oates as Abbott's religious sect "front" is simply mesmerizing when she hypnotizes Leslie Bank's comic relief friend, Clive. There are some stark Expressionistic shots of her through a glass lens, and as the light intensifies on her face, so does her perverse concentration. Almost zombie, cultlike.

The climax at the Royal Albert Hall was Hitch's largest scale set piece, a tour de force of sight and sound. Arthur Benjamin's soundtrack and his "Storm Clouds Cantata really raised the bar for movie music in those early days of sound, and even influenced Hitch's most famous composer, Bernard Herrmann, decades later when he re-scored the 1956 version. Herrmann had such admiration and respect for Benjamin's Cantata, that he used it intact, even doubling some of the parts and lengthening the score.

All of that said, don't just watch this for academic reasons. It's hugely entertaining, and has lots of great gags and suspense."
Far superior to doris day version
corgi fan | toledo, ohio | 11/22/2007
(5 out of 5 stars)

"i have to admit right away that i am no fan of doris day, but, having said that, if you view both of these movies back to back and consider the age of the first one, you will find it to be far superior. the acting is better, the story is more tightly woven, and the ending is great--lots better than doris and her que sera...."
Vintage Hitchcock
Scott T. Rivers | Los Angeles, CA USA | 02/07/2009
(4 out of 5 stars)

"Alfred Hitchcock's tenure as the "Master of Suspense" truly began with this compact 1934 thriller. After a shaky start, Hitchcock maintains the European intrigue with a series of bravura set-pieces - climaxed by the Royal Albert Hall nail-biter and a lengthy gun battle in London's East End. Peter Lorre's offbeat villainy stands out among a memorable cast. "The Man Who Knew Too Much" is far superior to Hitchcock's overlong 1956 remake."