Search - Maborosi on DVD


Maborosi
Maborosi
Actors: Makiko Esumi, Takashi Naitô, Tadanobu Asano, Gohki Kashiyama, Naomi Watanabe
Director: Hirokazu Koreeda
Genres: Indie & Art House, Drama
UR     2000     1hr 50min

Hirokazu Kore-eda's haunting, graceful Japanese film features a concentrated and powerfully reserved performance by Makiko Esumi as Yumiko, a young woman whose life is defined by the death and disappearance of her loved on...  more »

    
1

Larger Image

Movie Details

Actors: Makiko Esumi, Takashi Naitô, Tadanobu Asano, Gohki Kashiyama, Naomi Watanabe
Director: Hirokazu Koreeda
Creators: Masao Nakabori, Tomoyo Oshima, Naoe Gozu, Yutaka Shigenobu, Teru Miyamoto, Yoshihisa Ogita
Genres: Indie & Art House, Drama
Sub-Genres: Indie & Art House, Drama
Studio: New Yorker Video
Format: DVD - Color,Widescreen - Subtitled
DVD Release Date: 11/21/2000
Original Release Date: 03/21/1997
Theatrical Release Date: 03/21/1997
Release Year: 2000
Run Time: 1hr 50min
Screens: Color,Widescreen
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaDVD Credits: 1
Total Copies: 0
Members Wishing: 15
MPAA Rating: Unrated
Languages: Japanese, Japanese
Subtitles: English

Similar Movies

Shall We Dance
Director: Masayuki Suo
   PG   2005   1hr 59min
Hula Girls
Director: Lee Sang-il
5
   NR   2007   3hr 20min

Similarly Requested DVDs

Y Tu Mama Tambien
Unrated
Directors: Alfonso Cuarón, Carlos Cuarón
   UR   2002   1hr 45min
   
The Missing
Single Disc Edition
Director: Ron Howard
   R   2004   2hr 17min
   
Love Comes to the Executioner
4
   R   2006   1hr 30min
   
Crashing
Director: Gary Walkow
8
   R   2008   1hr 20min
   
History on My Arms
Director: Lech Kowalski
1
   NR   2009   1hr 53min
   
The Ides of March
Director: George Clooney
   R   2012   1hr 41min
   
The Big Hit
Director: Kirk Wong
   R   1998   1hr 31min
   
Redbelt
Director: David Mamet
   R   2008   1hr 39min
   
Contagion
+ UltraViolet Digital Copy
   PG-13   2012   1hr 46min
   
Rampart
Director: Oren Moverman
   R   2012   1hr 47min
   
 

Movie Reviews

If you love Japanese culture, you'll love this film
R. Wingate | Windermere, FL | 12/31/2003
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Maborosi (Maboroshi no Hikari) is a beautiful film. It's simply one of the best movies in my Japanese collection (which isn't small). Not that having lived for several years in the rural area where much of the movie is set biases my opinion.The imagery and music are wonderful. The story is contemplative and haunting. Esumi Makiko is beautiful. The acting is as natural as the Japanese countryside. Even after many viewings, this movie holds up -- I wish I could find more like this one."
Follow the Light
Daitokuji31 | Black Glass | 06/19/2004
(5 out of 5 stars)

"If one is familiar with Kore-eda's later film _After Life_ one already knows that death and memory play key parts in his films. After creating stellar documentaries concerning such subjects as AIDS and what it is like for a Korean man passing himself off as Japanese for decades, Kore-eda created _Maborosi_ a film that takes a close look at the greif caused by losing a loved one.The film starts off by showing a young girl named Yumiko trying to convince her grandmother to return home, however, the grandmother is determined to return home to die. Yumiko is unable to prevent her grandmother from leaving and this weighs on her young mind. Warp twelve or so years later and Yumiko is married to her childhood friend Ikuo and is the mother of a three year old son. Yumiko and Ikuo are far from well off, they live in a very small apartment with incredibly thin walls, but they seem to be decently happy. Well, at least Yumiko seems happy. After her husband brings home his bike and leaves with an umbrella, the next thing we learn is that he was killed walking on the train tracks. A suspected suicide.Time passes and Yumiko's mother arranges her a marriage with a widower who lives in Kanazawa. Unlike her small apartment, Yumiko and her son move into a large old house with her new husband, his father, and his daughter. Ikuo gets along beautifully with his step-grandfather and step-sister and while it seems Yumiko likes her husband well enough, the shadow of Ikuo is always preasant.This is a gorgeous film. Kore-eda does a wonderful job depicting the living conditions of a lower working class family and goes on to show ramshackle, but lovely older homes by the sea. Yumiko's husband's home looks incredibly shabby on the outside, but the polished hardwood floors and traditional furniture are extraordinary. Kore-eda also pays close attention to nature by showing the natural beauty of the region."
Vermeer wanders along the japanese seashore
Timothy G. Lowly | Chicago, IL United States | 11/11/2003
(5 out of 5 stars)

"this is an amazing filmhaiku simpleimages framed long and slow like the esteemed dutch painter contemplating something darker than his typical subjectfew movies consider grief in such a profoundly and mysteriously moving waythankyou Hiokazu Kore-eda"
(mostly) Great movie, Bad Bad Bad transfer
xxxxxxxxx | timbuktu | 05/06/2003
(3 out of 5 stars)

"This movie is an all-time favorite of mine. I've seen it in the cinema close to ten times. The visual composition is extraordinary. Simple scenes like a bus coming into frame and around a corner--no plot, no action--are stunning and enthralling. The writing and acting are understated and powerful, finding the maximum expression with the minimum gesture. That said, the second half is too long. Even I get tired and have trouble keeping focus and this is supposed to be one of my favorites. References to Japanese culture may be slightly opaque, but actually it's really not hard to have some appreciation even without prior familiarity. For instance, a kettle on a flame in a household is a recurrent image. There may be some specific reference or message there, but I think it's sufficient to appreciate it as a sign of the warm interior of the household and the tea ready to serve to family or guests. Now, the reason for 3 stars only: The transfer is horrendous, abysmal, outrageous--this travesty demands retribution on whoever is responsible. Many reviewers refer to dark, indistinct images where characters can't even be recognized. The screen image is snowy throughout. Let me assure you that this never occurs in a decent print of the film, and to issue this transfer is a crime."