Search - Adam on DVD

Actors: Hugh Dancy, Peter Gallagher, Amy Irving, Rose Byrne, Frankie Faison
Director: Max Mayer
Genres: Comedy, Drama
PG-13     2010     1hr 39min

A delightful romantic story about two strangers in search of an extraordinary connection. Adam (Dancy) is a brilliant but awkward astronomy buff, who is drawn out of his sheltered existence by his beautiful and outgoing ne...  more »


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Movie Details

Actors: Hugh Dancy, Peter Gallagher, Amy Irving, Rose Byrne, Frankie Faison
Director: Max Mayer
Genres: Comedy, Drama
Sub-Genres: Romantic Comedies, Love & Romance
Studio: 20th Century Fox
Format: DVD - Color,Widescreen - Dubbed,Subtitled
DVD Release Date: 02/02/2010
Original Release Date: 01/01/2009
Theatrical Release Date: 01/01/2009
Release Year: 2010
Run Time: 1hr 39min
Screens: Color,Widescreen
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaDVD Credits: 1
Total Copies: 0
Members Wishing: 3
MPAA Rating: PG-13 (Parental Guidance Suggested)
Languages: English, French, Spanish
Subtitles: English, French, Spanish

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Movie Reviews

A True Picture of Asperger Disorder
S. Bordelon | Louisiana USA | 01/13/2010
(5 out of 5 stars)

"I cried during a lot of this young son has Asperger Disorder, and this is the most accurate depiction of a person on the Autism Spectrum that I've ever seen. I cried tears of joy that someone finally "got it," and will make others aware of the challenges and gifts of persons affected by Asperger's. I cried because I know my son's life will be more difficult due to his Asperger's. I cried because the world will present obstacles to him that I will not always be there to help him with. I cried because when we left the theater, my son was staring thoughtfully and I asked him to share his thoughts and he said...."Wow, I didn't realize that I would still have Asperger's when I grow up." I hope this movie brings awareness of autism to a large audience, and people will open themselves to getting to know a person with the become friends....and to realize the beautiful treasure that having a friend on the autism spectrum is. Too many people with Asperger's are lonely, ignored, unemployed, rejected, teased, and bullied. I hope this movie helps to change that in a small or big way, for my son and others....This is a lovely movie - it's funny, romantic, hopeful, and a great love story - you will never forget it."
I have Asperger's
L. Reynolds | United States | 09/12/2009
(5 out of 5 stars)

"I have Asperger's and I think that the portrayal of Asperger's in this film is wonderful. It is nice to have a movie I can relate to. Anyone who wishes to understand Asperger's better should see this film. It outranks Mozart and the Whale."
Overlooked gem
D. Singh | Grapevine, TX United States | 01/07/2010
(4 out of 5 stars)

"Overall, I found this to be an engaging, sweet movie much like the main characters in the film. As a parent of a young son with autism, I'm pleased Hollywood has evolved from "Rainman" to portraying a more realistic look at life on the autism spectrum. For those unfamiliar with or untouched by autism (unfortunately, more of us are), don't worry - the movie doesn't set out to educate the masses on the disorder. Also, the filmmakers don't betray the characters or the story by supplying the standard happy ending. Instead, the end is genuine, satisfying and most of all hopeful for all of us, especially my son."
A fascinating look inside an "Aspie" life
Sharon Isch | Washington, DC USA | 08/16/2009
(4 out of 5 stars)

"The ability to empathize--or "walk in someone else's shoes," can be particularly difficult for people with Asperger's syndrome, an offshoot of autism. That may be at least partly because Aspies, as they call themselves, can't read the body language or other "social signals" that give the rest of us important clues about what's really going on with other people. It wouldn't occur to an Aspie to tell a white lie or dissemble; they take themselves and all else literally. "Adam" is a fictional look at the life of one such young man and how he comes to cope with and surmount this particular disorder--especially as applied to romance and career.

I wanted to see this movie because I'd heard such great things about Hugh Dancy's performance in it and because in the past few years I've gotten to know, slightly, two exceptionally interesting people with Asperger's syndrome and wanted to know more about it. Luckily, before I saw it, I happened upon a rave review written by an "Aspie" and was able to go into the movie armed with his assurance that the filmmakers mostly got it right.

So--accuracy aside--how is "Adam" as entertainment? Excellent, in my view. In short order our hero, a lifetime New Yorker, finds himself newly orphaned, attracted to a young woman who's just moved into his building, out of a job...and totally at sea about what to do about any of it. Hugh Dancy as "Adam" is every bit as terrific as the press he's getting. And he gets great support from his co-stars, director and a story that not only rings true but also has a great sense of humor and (most unusual for a rom-com) doesn't telegraph its ending and, when it gets there, opts for believability over mush.

Also recommended: "Parallel Play," Pulitzer Prize winner Tim Page's deeply personal account of growing up with undetected Asperger's. The book is available here. A shorter version under the same title appeared in the New Yorker on 8/20/07 and is available at their web site."