Search - Aging Out on DVD


Aging Out
Aging Out
Actor: Jay O. Sanders
Directors: Maria Finitzo, Roger Weisberg, Vanessa Roth
Genres: Educational, Documentary
NR     2006     1hr 30min

Artfully directed by award-winning filmmaker Roger Weisberg and Vanessa Roth, AGING OUT chronicles the daunting obstacles that three young people in foster care encounter as they "age out" of the system and are suddenly on...  more »

     
1

Larger Image

Movie Details

Actor: Jay O. Sanders
Directors: Maria Finitzo, Roger Weisberg, Vanessa Roth
Creators: Arthur Yee, Gordon Quinn, Jim Morrissette, John Hazard, Sarah Levy, Shana Hagan, Slawomir Grunberg, Maria Finitzo, Roger Weisberg, Vanessa Roth, Deborah Clancy, Hilary Klotz, Jessie Pepper, Joanna Friedman, Stephen Segaller
Genres: Educational, Documentary
Sub-Genres: Educational, Politics
Studio: Docurama
Format: DVD - Color
DVD Release Date: 06/27/2006
Original Release Date: 01/01/2006
Theatrical Release Date: 01/01/2006
Release Year: 2006
Run Time: 1hr 30min
Screens: Color
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaDVD Credits: 1
Total Copies: 0
Members Wishing: 5
MPAA Rating: NR (Not Rated)
Languages: English

Similar Movies

Girlhood
Director: Liz Garbus
1
   NR   2004   1hr 22min
Children Underground
Director: Edet Belzberg
8
   NR   2003   1hr 44min
 

Movie Reviews

A gritty look at a side of foster care everyone wants to avo
MG | 04/26/2008
(5 out of 5 stars)

"As a Guardian ad Litem who has worked with many teens I can say this documentary accurately depicts how poorly we prepare foster youth for adulthood. So many fall through the cracks of the broken system and are so likely to repeat the family cycle that brought them into the foster care system as children or youths. The states that take these children away from their parents to give them a better life need to start working on means to assure that outcome. Many of the youths in the documentary describe the devastating effects of being moved again and again from home to home. They painfully share the fragmentation of their emotional attachments to anyone who cares for them, leading to their inability to care about or for themselves.

As to the reviewer above who mentioned the extra features pieces, I think the decision as to who they could include in the main documentary was probably based on the length of time they could follow the youths in question.

The epilogue of the documentary is heartbreaking. People who are upset with the outcomes should seriously think about giving back to their community and becoming mentors, Guardians ad Litem or Court Appointed Special Advocates for our foster youth. The children in foster care need advocates."