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Family Fundamentals
Family Fundamentals
Actors: Cynthia Alardo, Phil Alardo, Brian Bennett, Kathleen Bremner, Paul Bremner
Director: Arthur Dong
Genres: Documentary
NR     2005     1hr 15min


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Movie Details

Actors: Cynthia Alardo, Phil Alardo, Brian Bennett, Kathleen Bremner, Paul Bremner
Director: Arthur Dong
Creator: Arthur Dong
Genres: Documentary
Sub-Genres: Gay & Lesbian, Gay & Lesbian
Format: DVD - Color - Closed-captioned
DVD Release Date: 06/14/2005
Release Year: 2005
Run Time: 1hr 15min
Screens: Color
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaDVD Credits: 1
Total Copies: 0
Members Wishing: 0
MPAA Rating: NR (Not Rated)
Languages: English

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Movie Reviews

Families fight over the "G-word" topic
Jeffery Mingo | Homewood, IL USA | 07/17/2005
(3 out of 5 stars)

"This documentary covers three sets of homophobic people and their homophobic relatives. I think many people will relate because the gay people state, "I hate my relative's bigotry, but I still love them." and the homophobes say, "I hate my relative's sexuality, but I still love them."

It is scary to me that there is an anti-PFLAG in existence. But I credit the homophobic relative for speaking openly to the camera.

While this documentary showed a gay male couple, I was very please to see two single gay men. The Ellen coming-out episode ends with her not getting a girlfriend, but most media account show people coming out one second and happily-partnered the next. That may happen over the rainbow, but in the real world, good partners are hard to find.

Unfortunately, and as much as I love Arthur Dong, this was the weakest film of his that I have seen. In his previous documentaries, he interviews many people and they are more than happy to share their thoughts and concerns. In this work, two homophobic groups in the dyads refused to be interviewed. Dong is off-screen constantly raising questions because interviewees on both sides are reluctant to speak. Yes, this is a touchy subject, but I imagine that he could have found more willing participants, especially as much as Americans of all sexualities and religious views loving being in front of the camera.

This is an interesting piece, but I highly doubt that warring factions in families will watch it together."