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Little Erin Merryweather
Little Erin Merryweather
Actors: David Morwick, Vigdis Anholt, Elizabeth Callahan, Frank Ridley
Director: David Morwick
Genres: Horror, Science Fiction & Fantasy, Mystery & Suspense
R     2007     1hr 28min

Once upon a time death preyed upon a New England college campus. Rumors swirl that if you see a flash of red -- you re dead. Local stud Peter Bloom investigates the grisly killings until the stakes grow higher and the bod...  more »


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Movie Details

Actors: David Morwick, Vigdis Anholt, Elizabeth Callahan, Frank Ridley
Director: David Morwick
Genres: Horror, Science Fiction & Fantasy, Mystery & Suspense
Sub-Genres: Horror, Science Fiction & Fantasy, Mystery & Suspense
Studio: Indican
Format: DVD - Color,Widescreen
DVD Release Date: 08/07/2007
Original Release Date: 01/01/2006
Theatrical Release Date: 01/01/2006
Release Year: 2007
Run Time: 1hr 28min
Screens: Color,Widescreen
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaDVD Credits: 1
Total Copies: 0
Members Wishing: 5
MPAA Rating: R (Restricted)
Languages: English

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Movie Reviews

Bloodly Lovely!
J. Curley | NYC | 08/31/2007
(5 out of 5 stars)

"David Morwick and Vigdis Anholt are spectacular in this film as the protagonist and antagonist, cat and mouse or, more truly, wolf and wolf-killer, in this seat-grippping, heart-shredding film. One of the finest horror films of the past decade, Little Erin Merryweather, combines the baited-breath suspense of Hitchcock with the stylized violence (never gratuitous) of Dario Argento's seventies' "giallo" Italian horror films. Riveting, superbly paced, a tour de force for all the actors, it is scarlet sensational. Actor, writer, director, and producer David Morwick brings to the horror genre a frightening and intelligent film that will have you at the edge of the knife!"
Evan Matthews | Knoxville, TN | 03/09/2008
(5 out of 5 stars)

"That's exactly how I felt when I finished watching this film, sucker punched. I was hoping for some laughs from another grade D horror film. I guess the joke's on me. Little Erin Merryweather was good, not perfect but good. David Morwick is kind of the man behind the curtain as director, actor, writer. But I think it's safe to say his strength is in the acting department.

Morwick is very funny and likeable in the lead role of Peter and probably brings in the strongest performance. We all know that bumbling, fidgety kid we went to school with and Morwick plays that part perfectly, to a tee. Although Vigdis Anholt (Erin) doesn't say much, her performance can be summed up by the old adage, "if looks could kill. . ."
Her body language and chilling stares is what spooked me the most. I give the filmmakers two thumbs up for turning the genre on its head in a sense and letting a female villain take a whack at this. Where the film falls short is in the pacing. It's just too damn slow at times. But, this has made up for an overall style, mood and atmosphere of the film. Before you poo-poo this as just another low budget slasher, take another look. Speaking of the look of the film, it really captured those rich, depth of field shots.

What struck me the most with Little Erin Merryweather and I have seen other people comment on this is that they really achieved the throwback to the "70's". This film looks like it was made in 1976, 1977, right down to the actors. I would never have guessed this was made in 2006. There's no morphed reflection of today's society at all. I don't know how they achieved this, but they did."
Atmosphere is good
Desiree | Missouri, USA | 03/05/2008
(3 out of 5 stars)

"This may contain a *SPOILER* for some. This movie creates a good "scary feel", filmed nicely, but whatever happened to suspense? If you want suspense, don't look for it here. This is no who-dunnit or not surprising. You know exactly who the killer is from the getgo. The focus is on why she kills. I did like how they gradually and progressively presented that. She sort of reminds me of Glenn close in "Fatal Attraction", twisted as a result of a really messed up childhood. Well that's expected. Adults lugging dolls and imitating children's storybook characters are indicative of something not quite right."
Bill Retherford | USA | 11/29/2009
(5 out of 5 stars)

"A deliciously-scary throwback to the horror films of the 70s and 80s, Little Erin Merryweather has a panache all its own, an eerie yet elegant plot punctuated by scares and shocks reminiscent of the classic thriller Halloween - and a back story that re-boots, of all things, Little Red Riding Hood.

But this modern-day fairy tale soon turns very grim. Somewhere, lurking about the snowy woods of a small college town, a killer in red dispatches victims with three startling similarities: They're male, they're blond, and they have - take note - dirty hands. It's not a spoiler to say the killer is female and her motivation stems from a horrific upbringing by an evil father. Now she wants revenge. So beware her creepy, cracked porcelain doll, an artifact from childhood, with its ghoulish pair of hollowed-out eyes. And look out should you see a flash of red - trouble's ahead.

After the first murder, college student Peter Bloom (David Morwick) suspects a serial killer is on the loose. His buddies on the school paper razz him - after all, they point out, Peter also believes in Bigfoot and claimed one of his professors was a werewolf. Still, like any good reporter, Peter snoops, until uncovering the scoop that may win him a byline but cost him his life.

Morwick - who also directed the film and wrote its screenplay - is charming and determined, brave enough to take on the killer in a spooky school library, yet vulnerable enough to shyly squirm and stammer during a coffee date. Vigdis Anholt somehow brings a sweet, sympathetic frailty to her role as a serial killer. True, she's a loon, but not a mindless one, and when she flirts with Morwick and looks into his handsome face, you just know there's a part of her that wants to date this guy, not decapitate him. Then she looks at his fingers - too bad, the poor boy apparently has newsprint or something on them - and her rage kicks in.

Unlike nearly all of today's horror films, including virtually every minute of the Saw franchise, Merryweather's scares don't soak you in blood. For sure, the shocks are there: Be prepared to jump half-a-dozen times during the climax. But as Hitchcock proved in Psycho, and as Carpenter mastered in Halloween, Morwick knows simplicity scares best. His stark use of sound - the slash of a knife slicing a body, for instance - is actually far more terrifying than displaying the bloody leftovers.

Grossing out moviegoers is easy. Jolting them is hard. Giving them a reason to care about characters in trouble - that's even harder. Little Erin Merryweather takes that hardest of roads and succeeds. Much more than gore, its haunted resonance offers a lingering chill. Put it this way: If Jaws kept swimmers out of the water, then Little Erin Merryweather surely will keep your fingernails clean.