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Neon Genesis Evangelion - The End Of Evangelion
Neon Genesis Evangelion - The End Of Evangelion
Actors: Megumi Ogata, Megumi Hayashibara, Yűko Miyamura, Kotono Mitsuishi, Yuriko Yamaguchi
Directors: Hideaki Anno, Hiroyuki Ishidô, Kazuya Tsurumaki, Keiichi Sugiyama, Masahiko Ôtsuka
Genres: Action & Adventure, Drama, Television, Mystery & Suspense, Anime & Manga
NC-17     2002     1hr 30min

When the first Evangelion feature, Death and Rebirth, proved no more satisfying than the last episodes of the original series, Hideaki Anno brought his watershed epic to its conclusion in this final installment. End of Ev...  more »


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Movie Details

Actors: Megumi Ogata, Megumi Hayashibara, Yűko Miyamura, Kotono Mitsuishi, Yuriko Yamaguchi
Directors: Hideaki Anno, Hiroyuki Ishidô, Kazuya Tsurumaki, Keiichi Sugiyama, Masahiko Ôtsuka
Genres: Action & Adventure, Drama, Television, Mystery & Suspense, Anime & Manga
Sub-Genres: Action & Adventure, Drama, Television, Mystery & Suspense, Anime & Manga
Studio: wea
Format: DVD - Color,Widescreen - Animated,Dubbed,Subtitled
DVD Release Date: 09/24/2002
Theatrical Release Date: 07/30/2002
Release Year: 2002
Run Time: 1hr 30min
Screens: Color,Widescreen
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaDVD Credits: 1
Total Copies: 0
Members Wishing: 17
MPAA Rating: NC-17
Languages: English, Japanese, English
Subtitles: English

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Movie Reviews

Brilliant in Concept, Complex in Execution
Marc Ruby? | Warren, MI USA | 10/20/2002
(5 out of 5 stars)

"This film is the second ending produced for this series. The first ending (Episodes 25 and 26) left fans so dissatisfied that director Hideaki Anno felt compelled to create an alternate ending and issue it as a full length film. One should keep in mind when watching it that in the voice commentary provided in this edition this film is referred to as "Hideaki's revenge." I really do not think that is true, but there is no question but that the Director/Creator of this film has made a film that challenges the view on all fronts, making it an unusually difficult film.The film opens on the impending destruction of NERV headquarters. With the destruction of the 'Angels,' the members of SEELE move to implement their plan for the forced evolution of humankind. Stage 1 is the capture or destruction of the EVA and their 'riders.' For the rest of the NERV staff only a grim and violent death is offered. Shinji and Asuka manage to activate their EVAs and fight back. Meanwhile, Rei descends into the heart of NERV with Dr. Ikari to confront Lilith.While this apocalypse occupies the first part of the film, filling the screen with both spellbinding action and some unnerving interior insights, one could argue that it is only a prelude to the real core of the film. Almost haphazardly, symbols from the Kabbala and the Crucifixion are woven into the action as SEELE prepares the ritual that will recreate humanity. Magically, Rei and Shinji become the main characters in a metaphysical play that will decide the future of man. It is no surprise that these two become bound to the moments of decision and rebirth. Both the characters are not completely whole as personalities. To each of them the conflict over individuality is both interior and exterior. Without these flaws, the decision would not have been in doubt.As the story progresses fluid, the hurried action of the attack on NERV is replaced by a more elegiac pace. Longer still shifts and slower pacing give the viewer a rest, but at the price of an ever more complex and difficult plot. Without the film length commentary available on the DVD, much of the subtexts to the visual displays would remain impenetrable. This is the first time that I have felt that the commentary was required viewing. This film is worth seeing simply for its stretching of the limitations of anime. This is a marvelous but elusive work of art. Be warned - 'The End of Evangelion' lacks any manner of explanation of the events leading up to the film. Thus, familiarity with either 'Death and Rebirth' or the series itself is almost a requirement for making good sense of what is happening."
Not an alternate ending, but rather a physical one
Anders Jorgensen | Okemos, Michigan, USA | 06/14/2002
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Having read numerous reviews of this film, I feel it to be necessary to clarify several issues. Most prominent among them is the common misconception that this film is an 'alternate ending'. Though it is, of course, different from the version seen in the television series, it results in the same essential end. This is actually a physical depiction of the end of Neon Genesis Evangelion, as the first ending was, in fact, the more psychological, 'post-apocalypse' (if you will accept this description) ending. The end to the television series occurs not during the 'third-impact' (yes, this is a spoiler), but a year afterward, when instrumentality (or complementation, which is what the official Manga subtitled version addresses it as) has succeeded, and mankind has been merged. This film doesn't disregard the scenes in the final two episodes, as, in fact, every 'anomalous' scene from episode twenty five (The Ending World) from the series is seen in its true form in this film. Of course, in the end of this film itself, it's far different from the end seen on television, but this is intentional, as Anno intended to destroy any preconceived notions established about the answers to the anomalies presented in the original series, and, also, to frighten and disturb the viewer out of complacency. Having seen this film in both the 'official' (Manga subtitled) version, and the Fansub version, I can honestly state that this is, perhaps, one of the most frightening and disturbing anime films ever, but, also, it is my favorite (of course, I'm biased, as Neon Genesis Evangelion is my favorite anime, and, in my opinion, the greatest ever created).I can't wait to see this film in its English glory, as I prefer the English vocal actors to the Japanese ones (though the Japanese VAs certainly do justice to the characters), and am incredibly pleased to see that all of the original VAs are reprising their roles.However, as a warning, this should not be seen until one sees the entirety of the TV series (not Death and Rebirth, as Death is only a brief digest with new footage, and not a true synopsis{plus, why would anyone only want to see a synopsis?!}), as the series itself is so incredibly wonderful, and it is also essential to understanding The End of Evangelion. In summation, if you are only able to make two purchases, purchase the TV Perfect Collection, as well as The End of Evangelion. I can assure you that you won't be at all disappointed.P.S.
As mentioned previously, I'm a complete Eva fanatic, so don't believe that this is even remotely objective. Also, don't believe that seeing this will destroy any joy in the TV series, as I've seen The End of Evangelion twice and I am enjoying the series just as much as the first time on my (I believe) fifteenth viewing (yes, I am also a college student and a writer, so I do have the capacity to make an informed opinion)."
Ending of the original TV series vs. The End of Evangelion
D. K. Malone | earth | 06/04/2005
(5 out of 5 stars)

"I just wanted to post this quote because I think it's something people should know regarding the relationship between the TV series and this movie:

"According to 'The Red Cross Book' (which was sold at End Of Evangelion screenings during its original theatrical release in Japan in 1997 and was officially endorsed by Gainax,) the original scripts for the final two episodes of the TV series were scrapped at the last minute. The reasons are not divulged, but there are rumors that sponsor funding was cut due to controversy about the content, and that Hideaki and Gainax were pressured to end the series differently, in a very short time frame. The result is that the final two episodes of the TV series bear little resemblance to the rest of the show. The book then goes on to say that the original scrapped scripts were essentially fished out of the garbage and that they became the basis for the feature film End of Evangelion. In other words, it's arguable that the final two episodes of the TV series are invalid, and that End of Evangelion is in fact the true ending to the series as originally envisioned by its creators."
BENY P JOSE | Pennsylvania, USA | 12/23/2002
(5 out of 5 stars)

"As I read many reviews of this DVD, I can't help but feel that people seemed to have missed certain vital elements. NOTE: THE FOLLOWING CONTAINS SPOILERS.As most fans should know, this movie is an ending to NEON GENESIS EVANGELION. It answers most of the questions left behind.Now, here is the thing. It is completely consistent with the last two episode of the series until the very end. Until then, it is a very nice external visualization of what's going on, while the last two episodes took place inside Shinji's mind.At the end of the movie, however, Shinji rejects the Instrumentality Project. While in the series, he accepts it, here, he just flat out says no. He was egged on by Rei.. and ended up dismembering her (thankfully so) to achieve his goal. At the end, he and Asuka (not some new chick.. it's just Asuka) are the only two living human beings on Earth. The rest are LCL, and can come back to life if they will themselves to do it (like Shinji did earlier).I don't remember if DEATH AND REBIRTH had all of the deleted scenes, but there were deleted scenes in the Japan that were integral. In Japan, when the DVDs came out, they were Director's Cut and had some extra scenes. Here, they were not. The only really important ones that I can think of are when:(1)Rei defeats the angel that takes over her body. In the extras, the angel started to take over Shinji's body when he came out (It lunged at him, he dodged, blocked, and grabbed it, but that was enough for the angel) and started taking on the appearance of Rei, so Rei pulled the whole thing toward herself.. thus, she saved Shinji's life.(2)The episode with Kaworu (the last angel) has several moments.. mainly when he talks to SEELE panels (sound only things) and Misato spies on him. He waves to her.. which really freaks her out. It's revealed that he was made from Adam, like Rei was made (partially) from Lilith.and (3)someone asks Gendo how the "Adam Project" was coming along, and he said "Right on time" or something and pulled off his glove to reveal Adam (The first angel.. the embryo thing) as embedded in his hand. This is why he sticks his hand into Rei in the movie.. and why she lopped it off.Also, as for the angels, Adam is the first. He is the embryo. Lilith is the second, she is the big white thing. While the numbering does not really matter, the distinction does. Lilith is identified by Kaworu. The union of another angel with Adam caused the Third Impact. The embryonization (or whatever) of Adam caused the Second Impact.This angel thing would have made more sense if they made Adam and Lilith the parents of the other angels. Referring to people as Lilum (offspring of Lilith) is just plain not nice to the mythology behind Lilith. Adam fathers humans with Eve. Adam fathers monsters with Lilith (at least one, anyway). There were just some things in the series that were misplaced.. fans should at least admit that (like when they showed Shinji's Eva suit in the cockpit when he turned into LCL.. despite the fact that he was wearing civilian clothes).Sorry about the rant.. but things just had to be set straight. As "artsy" and abstract as this whole Evangelion thing was, there are some things are just plain misunderstood."