Search - Sweet Sixteen - Director's Cut (1983) on DVD


Sweet Sixteen - Director's Cut (1983)
Sweet Sixteen - Director's Cut
1983
Actors: Patrick Macnee, Susan Strasberg, Dan Stroud, Bo Hopkins, Steve Antin
Director: Jim Sotos
Genres: Horror, Science Fiction & Fantasy, Mystery & Suspense
R     2008     1hr 27min

When Melissa Morgan (Aleisa Shirley), a gorgeous big city girl moves to a small Texas town, she creates quite a stir with her beauty and promiscuous attitude. She might be 15, going on 25, but all the boys at her new schoo...  more »

     
6

Larger Image

Movie Details

Actors: Patrick Macnee, Susan Strasberg, Dan Stroud, Bo Hopkins, Steve Antin
Director: Jim Sotos
Genres: Horror, Science Fiction & Fantasy, Mystery & Suspense
Sub-Genres: Horror, Fantasy, Mystery & Suspense
Studio: Code Red
Format: DVD - Color,Widescreen,Anamorphic
DVD Release Date: 10/14/2008
Original Release Date: 01/01/1983
Theatrical Release Date: 01/01/1983
Release Year: 2008
Run Time: 1hr 27min
Screens: Color,Widescreen,Anamorphic
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaDVD Credits: 1
Total Copies: 0
Members Wishing: 19
Edition: Director's Cut
MPAA Rating: R (Restricted)
Languages: English

Similar Movies

Bloody Birthday
Director: Ed Hunt
7
   R   2003   1hr 25min
Student Bodies
Director: Mickey Rose
   R   2008   1hr 26min
Silent Scream
Director: Denny Harris
5
   R   2009   1hr 27min
Stagefright
Director: Michele Soavi
8
   NR   2007   1hr 30min
 

Movie Reviews

Everyone is DYING to meet her
Bartok Kinski | Prague | 09/17/2008
(3 out of 5 stars)

"The film revolves around Melissa, a girl turning sixteen. The boys adore her...but they can't seem to be around her for an extended time. As the tag line declares, "everyone is DYING to meet her". Every boy around Melissa dies soon after encountering her. Sweet Sixteen is a cryptic film that is often enjoyable. Not often is the horror genre mixed with mystification, but in the case of Sweet Sixteen it is. Southern Sheriff Bo Hopkins is once again a crumb to watch, as he plays the role for the hundredth time. The film isn't as obvious as you might think, and it holds your interest until the finale. Few flaws in the film makes it a pleasurable viewing. You'll enjoy the film and its astounding climax. The acting is standard, and the film is as well."
Interesting, overlooked indie slasher.
Robert P. Beveridge | Cleveland, OH | 06/01/2009
(3 out of 5 stars)

"Sweet Sixteen (Jim Sotos, 1982)

Jim Sotos--a nom de plume for music video and TV commercial mogul Dimitri Sotirakis--directed only four movies in his long and distinguished career, but all four of them are well-respected by a small, but steadily growing, number of critics and fans. Interestingly, Sotirakis' four movies are all in different genres. Forced Entry was a straight thriller. Hot Moves was a cheap exploitation film. Beverly Hills Brats was a family comedy. And then there is Sweet Sixteen, his entry into the horror genre. It's a pretty basic slasher film with supernatural elements, but Sotirakis' ability to convince pretty big names to appear in his movies, as well as his distinctive directorial style, put Sweet Sixteen above the average level of film coming out during the great slasher film glut of the early eighties.

Melissa (Aleisa Shirley from Spacehunter: Adventures in the Forbidden Zone) and her family have just moved to a small desert town (and we get the feeling this isn't the first time they've moved house in the recent past) that seems quiet on the surface, but has a lingering, nasty racism brewing just beneath the surface. Melissa, being the naïve new kid, stumbles into the middle of a confrontation between a Native American man and a high school classmate (which has nothing to do with my plot synopsis, but sets up a lot of stuff later, so pay attention to it) before she and a prospective new boyfriend head off for some alone time. Everything's all well and good until he turns up dead the next morning. This starts a trend, unfortunately, and suspicion falls equally on Melissa and Jason Longshadow (Don Shanks of Halloween 5), the Native American guy I mentioned before. Melissa's father, archaeologist John Morgan (The Avengers' Patrick Macnee), being more civilized than the natives, doesn't believe the red Injun is responsible (since everyone else thinks he is because he's a red Injun) and can't believe his daughter capable of the murders, so he sets out to figure out what's going on before one of them gets lynched.

One of the things that distinguishes Sweet Sixteen from its contemporaries is its examination of racism. Sure, by 1982, film had explored racism before. But in slasher films? Not your typical content. As well, when was the last time you saw Patrick Macnee in a slasher flick? (You never did again, either.) As well, the cast also includes Susan Strasberg (as Melissa's beleaguered mom) and Don Stroud; a pretty heavy cast indeed for an early-eighties movie of any sort not produced by Irwin Allen. While the script (the first--and last--feature-length script by Erwin Goldman) doesn't give the cast a great deal to work with, they do what they can, and make the material seem a bit better tan it actually is. Not too many surprises to be had here, but it's a good, solid slasher flick from the heyday of slasher flicks, and it's been unjustly overlooked in recent years. Rediscover it if you're a fan of the genre; it's worth your while. ***
"
WHAT'S SO GREAT ABOUT MELISSA MORGAN?
The Critic | Windsor | 03/27/2010
(4 out of 5 stars)

"What's so great about Melissa Morgan?

When 15 year old Melissa Morgan moves to a small town and enrolls in a new school she becomes the center of attraction and all the boys at school want to personally get to know her. What does the beautiful Melissa have that all the other girls in town don't? Why are all the boys dying to meet her? Soon after Melissa dates one of the local boys he ends up dead and local Sheriff Dan Burke played by (Bo Hopkins) begins to investigate.

Will the death of Melissa's date be the only one or is it the first of many to come? Is Melissa the killer or is it just a coincidence the murder happened when she came to town? What secret is Melissa Morgan Hiding? Why is her 16th Birthday so special and will the secret be unveiled in time? Sorry! You'll have to buy your own copy to find out how it ends.

From Jim Sotos the director who gave us the very graphic and brutal 1975 "Forced Entry" comes "Sweet Sixteen" from 1983. For some reason this movie doesn't get very much playing time if any and until now it was hard to find. To me the film is pretty much an 80's slasher film with a mix of suspense and horror thrown in. The story and plot as with most of the acting is pretty good in my opinion and I enjoyed seeing this movie again. This movie features a good cast with names that include Bo Hopkins, Patrick MacNee, Susan Strasberg, Larry Storch, and Michael Pataki. I think that the plot has enough twists in it to hold your attention right up until the unexpected ending.

As for the DVD release of "Sweet Sixteen" - The Director's Cut, Is it really worth owning? The DVD itself is nicely packaged but the video and sound quality of this new "Director's Cut" release from Code Red is a slap in the face to any fan of this movie. The video image is riddled with debris and age related artifacts and it's evident that Code Red didn't spend any money on cleaning up the print for this DVD release. I would rate the video transfer of this DVD release somewhere between bootleg and VHS quality. The sound isn't much better as it contains some hissing and crackling throughout.

DVD Features Include:
-Intro by Scott Spiegel/Aleisa Shirley
-Audio conversation with star Aleisa Shirley and director Jim Sotos at Scott Spiegel's "den"
-On-camera interview with stars Bo Hopkins and Aleisa Shirley
-Stills gallery
-Theatrical trailer
-Original theatrical version of "Sweet Sixteen"

The original theatrical version of "Sweet Sixteen" is found in the special features section of the DVD. The quality is so poor that there is a disclaimer about the video quality before the movie starts. Unless you're a hard core fan of this movie and have to own it for your collection, I'd recommend renting it first to see what you're getting."